Parents: YouTube

Image via BOSSFIGHT

There are a lot of things I don’t like about this article, mostly because it feels a bit more political than it needs to be, but, that’s probably my insecurity with such things.

But, it was these few things that really caused me to pause for a moment and consider my own decisions as a parent:

As events like this underscore, you can’t trust a YouTube channel about games is merely a YouTube channel about games. In the personality-based Internet, politics can be fair game.

And…

There are no easy answers. If anything, they’re going to get more complicated. If Jafari’s racist comments happen on Twitter, does that mean my daughter shouldn’t watch his YouTube videos? Can I be fully confident he’s not slipping that rhetoric, however subtle, in there? My gut tells me it’d be time to move on — or, at least, to pay closer attention and engage with her about what’s being said.

The point is that, as parents, we may have a never-ending battle of feeling “out of touch” or not “in the know” with what our children are consuming, day-in and day-out.

My wife and I aren’t interested in being anything close to a “helicopter parent” and we don’t actively monitor our childrens’ every move. We create basic limitations and boundaries just like most parents and then we try our hardest to create a safe environment where our kids can discuss the topics that they might encounter.

We’re not perfect, but, man… we’re trying.


Originally published at John Saddington.