Remember when we thought Facebook and Twitter were going to allow and even encourage this kind of…
Dean Davis
21

Dean.

The nerd in me mixed with the lame in me mixed with the “I can delay my podcast today because this conversation is a giving me plenty of stimuli” me is over the moon with our discourse. Thank you for not humoring me and actually listening enough to give insightful/logical feedback. In classical debates and study of rhetoric, they say you can tell a listener from a talker by the way they respond to your points.

In elementary school they tell you to make sure you repeat the question in the answer so the person feels validated and you seem smarter, essentially.

As we get older and more educated, I feel we lose this technique that once gave us points on our assignments.

This is in response to your “not humoring you” statement. I think our unwillingness to listen to people makes it impossible for us to understand let alone communicate effectively.

Even on platforms such as this and LinkedIn, which I grew excruciatingly annoyed with, do not always foster this dynamic. I often became disillusioned whenever I reply with a well thought out comment and it goes unnoticed or unappreciated; it almost feels like no one is listening.

So I reserve my words for my journal or letters to the editor of random newspapers. Often, my friends who value conversations with substance, validate me. (I am very grateful for them, by the way).

While, I try not to become emotionally affected by the dismissal of society when these important topics come up, I equally grow fascinated by how this continues to happen.

You were referring to facebook and twitter and how communication junkies like us initially romanticized this platform; that it would unite us by offering intellectual stimuli with a mouse click.

Pretty damn idealist view, don’t you think?

Instead we became bombarded with ignorance, the use of the profane as defensive mechanism, and one by one, our insecurities opened like a unattended wound.

In my opinion, once our insecurities become the driving force, compassion slowly fades.

To listen is to be compassionate.

I am not perfect even as I preach this but my years in non-profit have drilled this notion of compassion in to my mind and soul.

A random question for you....

Do you think pacifists have more fun?

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