What We Can Learn From a Forty-Year Old Handshake in Space
Ron Garan
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When I was groing up in Ukraine, we sang one song over and over, it was a song for peace. First day of school, no matter the grade leve, had one lesson for the day, the lesson was about world peace. After that, we were free to go home and only the next day would we learn the subjects which would get us to the peace. Even though the two countries were enemies, they were both bent on one thing: a better life and world peace, they just dissagreed on how to get there. Today is very different.

The sad difference between the handshake on Soyuz-Apollo is that the wishes from Brezhnev were wishes of peace and future. Meanwhile in Iran, Ayatolah wished for death to America before the ink was even dry. I think our differences on attaining peace can still lead us to peace and out of the trenches of fear, but when one side wishes for peace and the other for war and destruction, the paths don’t matter because all of them lead to a burning Rome.

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