In academic writing, it is wise to be careful in one’s statements to differentiate between facts and claims. This is customarily known as “hedging.” Hedging is a pragmatic linguistic device that expresses tentativeness or skepticism on one’s proposition and exhibits politeness and open-mindedness.

People use hedged language for various purposes, but most often to: Read More…

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It is interesting how an article, when it precedes a word, can change the meaning of the sentence altogether, and one such word is “Few.” The context becomes completely different when the article “a” precedes it. The words few and a few are often used interchangeably; the difference is subtle but notable.

While few connotes a negligible quantity or an insignificantly small number, a few signifies ‘some’ or ‘a handful.’ For instance, Read More..

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When someone gives you an opinion, should you thank them for their advice or advise? Well, if you have ever wondered about the difference between the two words or have used them interchangeably, you are not alone! Advice and advise are among the most commonly confused words because they are both used to refer to a suggestion or an idea. Read More..

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