The industry most effective in bringing about diversity and equality in work is stuck in old ways.

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The world of work is changing, without a doubt. But the way in which people and places find one another is lagging behind. The recruitment industry is founded on believes that built up the labor market as we know it — long-term career objectives and a one-way path to success. But in the hyper-digital, fast-paced society of today, modern workers have shifted their goals; success is a luxury, development, however, is a necessity.

The things valued in a career are changing. Not only do employees seek personal development in their jobs, companies too are gravitating towards waging a purposeful contribution to society alongside remaining a profitable business. But how is this change reflected in the way people and places find each other? Today still, recruitment often revolves around CVs, past career achievements and one-dimensional assessments. …


Is your company ready for a reality shaped by distributed workforce?

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The year 2020 marks the global breakthrough of remote working, or rather: distributive working. With the COVID-19 crisis pushing aside the normality of office work, working remotely is gaining momentum. It has been growing in popularity among businesses and workers over the past few years, yet remote working always revolved around a central entity: the main office.

However, this centrality is pushed aside as we are collectively forced into a massive experiment of working distributively following the coronavirus measures. …


Let’s own up to our responsibilities and make the best of this work-from-home reality.

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It’s weeks like these, when the world is forced to show its most flexible side in the battle against the coronavirus, that we need each other. Not physically, but online. The world of work is undeniably affected by the measures that have been taken to overcome the health thread of COVID-19. Except for those in vital professions, such as the doctors and nurses we so desperately need, we are collectively urged to work from home. …


In defence of the introverted colleague and their often overlooked talents.

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Professional life seems to revolve around the extrovert. The ones thriving on social contacts, interaction, crowds and chaos. Those able to feel at ease among strangers within seconds. But what about the ones not eager to expand their already intimidating social circles — what about introverts?

Modern companies often value the personalities that are able to keep up with constant change, new actors and novel environments. Successful CEO’s too are often extroverted, surrounding themselves with other extroverts. Unconsciously, we have created a professional world that celebrates the extrovert and oftentimes frightens the introvert. That’s a shame, because introverts too contribute greatly to the performance and wellbeing of a company. …


No time like the present to start enjoying your career again.

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The unsettling feeling of being stuck at work is doing more damage than you’d expect. Feeling stuck can put a strain on you and your work, even though you might very well still be happy with your current job. However, determining the reason why you feel stuck is quite a challenge.

There are plenty of reasons why you might be feeling stuck at work. In fact, it’s probably a complex blend of deep-rooted concerns underlying this feeling. …


The primitive principles behind successful teams.

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We’re social creatures. All of us. Introverts, extraverts and every other ‘-vert’ within the social spectrum — we need other people. Not in the least do we need them to keep existing as a species, but other than that do we naturally crave the recognition of others. We gather, we communicate, we argue and compromise, all in search for recognition. Certainly, nuance is necessary when we address the extent to which we need other people. Some more than others, of course. But compared to other species’ social lives, we probably take the crown.

Fortunately, we’re generally quite good at managing relations and dividing attention. We need to be; we depend on it. Especially when it comes to work. After all, the success of a company is the sum of its people. A group of people that grinds each other’s gears equals a dysfunctional company. A group of people that completes the circuit, however, equals a highly functioning business. And happy employees. The work tribe may therefore very well be the secret to personal and collective success. …


The only constant is change, so embrace it. Especially when you and your job are no longer on the same page.

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An off day at work is common to everyone, even an off week is not something to worry about. However, when off weeks turn into off months — suggesting you’re structurally unhappy with your job — it’s time for change.

Your twenty-year-old self would probably hate your guts for — after years of education and internships — no longer enjoying the job that took so much time and effort to get. After all, from our childhood until well into our twenties, our lives are occupied with making decisions for a future we have no way of knowing. …


About ping pong tables and other false truths.

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Every active member of the labor market knows the struggle: identifying a company culture before applying for a job. To make sure this next step in your career is not one followed by regret, it’s advised to do some thorough digging into the values and internal policies of a company. But unfortunately, there is no concept more abstract than a company culture. In fact, looking at the amount of adjectives thrown around when addressing their cultures, it seems as if companies themselves are struggling to define their in-house identity. Decorated with descriptive words while at the same time complicated by the exact same words, company cultures have become the untouched mystery of today’s society. …


How quantum computing might change the way we experience life, solve problems and shape our future — be prepared.

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Where a century ago Schrödinger’s cat was as alive as it was dead, we are now on the brink of a second quantum revolution. Schrödinger’s attempt to illustrate the profoundly paradoxical nature of quantum mechanics appeared to deny its purpose. Subatomic principles forced into the laws of macroscopic dimensions were deemed to miss Schrödinger’s point, as critiqued by Mr Hawking himself. The ability of quantum mechanic particles to exist in more than one position at the same time is exceeding our simple, macroscopic brains. …

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Sara de Rouw

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