What Makes Mobile Reading Experience So Different?

If you’re ready to enter the mobile app market, then you have to think about how to adjust your content in terms of the mobile reading experience. Continue with…

…connecting with the users effectively

Nobody enjoys annoying push notifications and that’s why they should not be too frequent. Each should add real value to the mobile experience, product usage or the overall customer experience. The message should be either informative or entertaining.

…setting up user-friendly functionality

You need to remember about the small screen, the wide technical variations between mobile devices, the changing availability of the Internet due to movement, and the specificity of finger scrolling. You should prioritize featuring content that is especially relevant in a mobile app experience. For example, make the phone numbers in your Contacts section click-to-call.
If certain functionality does not fit into your mobile app, don’t worry — you can always direct your customers to your website or other appropriate channel.

…improving the look of your content

Remember that your users might prefer reading from a horizontal screen instead of a vertical one because that is more familiar to them due to their previous use of a desktop computer. You’ve probably heard about the three clicks rule, which emphasizes the need to cut the number of taps and clicks to a minimum.

While User Interface Engineering research proves that users do not necessarily leave after three clicks, they still need to have a clear understanding that they are getting closer to completing the task. The most valuable content that you really want the users to read should be placed as close to the landing page as possible (or even on it).

…taking navigation to a new level

Users always need an understandable clue for where they are exactly, how they can get back to the start and how they can move forward with the content — make sure that they can move anywhere from anywhere.

We’ve already seen that the mobile screen is extremely difficult to develop for, so save space and time by using simple and universal icons (for example, a home icon for Home or right and left arrows for moving forward and backward). Navigation links and items should have concise and clear descriptions.

…engaging mobile readers with deep content

Depending on the specifics of your product or service, the mix of content presented in your mobile app should be balanced with support information, product guides, social information, marketing materials and instructions if necessary. Keep in mind that multimedia content (especially with motion, which is the most distracting) is more appropriate for entertaining and instructing.

Let the customers have control over sound and popping videos. Make sure that your images are scaled for small screens and are sharp enough for Retina screens. Being on the move, your mobile readers will most likely have limited time for careful reading, so make sure you state the most important ideas clearly and concisely.

…rework mobile design for comfortable reading

It’s rather funny that even websites for world-known brands still request iPhone users to install Flash. Your formats and your designs should be a really deep rethink of your desktop version. Your primary design goals here are providing the users with good scanning opportunities and catching their eye with the elements’ hierarchy and clarity. Colors and styles should correspond with the ones you’ve been using throughout your website and other marketing channels. Visual flow elements (such as color gradients, transparency, arrows and contrast) can serve as guides for the customers’ eyes to help them follow the exact path of thought you’d like them to take.

Mobile reading is still a developing concept, and you can overtake your competitors by putting yourself into your customers’ shoes as much as possible. Undoubtedly, we could go on with this list. What else would you suggest as a must for creating an unforgettable mobile reading experience? Please share your thoughts!

Images Source: Tom Fishburne Blog