mauludSADIQ
May 16 · 4 min read

History’s not just in the books, it’s right down the street from you

After 1975, due to the drastic changes implemented by Imam Warith Deen Muhammad, many of his followers grew to look at their time under Elijah Muhammad in a negative light.

Free from the Restrictive Law and the watchful eyes of Investigators, Squad Leaders, Lieutenants, Captains, Secretaries, Ministers, the weekly responsibility of selling the Muhammad Speaks, and strict dress code, members were now free to focus solely on their Religion.

Arabic was learned, what many consider to be Islamic culture (ie clothing, speech patterns, grooming) was adopted, and the name Bilalian took the place of former identifiers such as black, Asiatic, Afro-American, etc.

While many of the Temples were small in real estate, their influence and impact were immeasurable. To illustrate that point, consider this: Islam is the fastest growing religion in America — many of whom are foreign-born, yet a whopping 42% of all Muslims in America are native, Black Americans — 90% of whom can trace their origins back to these for mentioned Temples.

Led by the late Imam WD Muhammad, Muslims who once shunned their past experiences, are now reflecting on the positive aspects of their sojourn through Islam; they’re remembering the Faith, the Spirit, the Drive, and the Outreach — all of which made Islam possible.

I can never emphasize enough — these Masjids below are a fountain of information and are overflowing with members who can provide us with great wisdom. Take advantage of these Living Legends while you can.

note: all of the below are the buildings that were once NOI Temples and made the change after 1975. It’s well-documented that Islamic communities exist all over the US.

Masjid Wali Muhammad, Detroit, MI

Masjid Muhammad, Washington DC

Masjid Ul-Haqq, Baltimore, MD

Masjid Malcolm Shabazz, Harlem, NY

(the former) Temple 7, today. courtesy of Google Maps

Masjid Taqwa, San Diego, CA

Masjid of the Quran, Boston, MA

Masjid Ali Muslim, Newark, NJ

Masjid Bilal, Los Angeles, CA

Masjid Al-Muminun, St Louis, MO

Masjid Al-Ansar, Miami, FL

Masjid Omar, Kansas City, MO

Masjid Ar-Razzaq, Durham, NC

Masjid Taqwa, Trenton, NJ

Masjid of Al-Islam, New Orleans, LA

Masjid Mu’min, Oklahoma City, OK


If you have any history of the above Masjids, especially history pre-dating 1975, or if this is the Masjid that you grew up in, we would love to have your stories in the comments below. Let us know if we can share your stories beneath the images above. Shukran.

And as always, click on them clapping hands and share, share alike.

mauludSADIQ

Written by

b-boy, old dude, Hip-Hop Investigating, music lovin’ Muslim

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