5 fixable mistakes that kill freelancing dreams (on Upwork)

Sean Meyer
Image credit: Pixabay

Freelancing has had a special place in my heart ever since I started 2.5 years ago, and most of that’s because I love all the freedom it provides…

But also because there’s just so much terrible information out there today.

It seems like most of this starts with school, where we’re told to create resumes that “sound professional” and brag ourselves up for 10 minutes…

Which don’t get me wrong, that might work in the corporate world where they hire for right answers and fancy degrees, but that’s where most of the disconnect happens — because freelancing is a completely different animal.

What do I mean?

Well, instead of having corporate clients that follow traditional HR patterns and think they need to do things like they’ve always been done before…

Freelancing clients are only looking for one thing — what you can do for them.

This is the same reason why they’re hiring freelancers (not employees), and like many others — I didn’t realize this when I first started.

I was so used to the corporate world where I needed a fancy “resume” and robotic cover letters that I automatically transferred these traits into the freelance world…

And even though I had my Master’s in Accounting, along with a few other certifications (including IRS Enrolled Agent) and years of experience…

I still couldn’t land a bookkeeping client to save my life.

This really surprised me at first as I’d looked at a lot of other bookkeeping profiles and knew I was way more qualified to take on the job, and also had a rate that was very competitive with all the others…

But no matter what I did or how hard I tried, I could barely make enough money to keep the lights on.

I tried a few other random things in the meantime, like creating videos and taking all the tests I could think of…

But after continuously failing for 2 months and running out of money, I finally decided to swallow my pride and ask others for help.

I started off by going through countless forums to see if I could find any help there…

And as most other freelancers notice, these are hardly ever helpful.

It seems like if anything, it’s just a bunch of disgruntled freelancers on there who are throwing their insecurities onto others, telling them not to mess with freelance job boards as they’re a waste of time (a.k.a — they couldn’t get jobs themselves)…

And after going through these for a few hours, well — I think I was honestly farther away from my goal than when I first started.

I was starting to think that they might be right, and how maybe I just needed to give up on my freelancing dreams…

But I really didn’t want to do that, so after a little more thought I decided to jump on Quora…

Seeing if I might be able to find some useful information on there.

Things started off just like they did with the forums, finding nothing more than a bunch of disgruntled freelancers who were talking about how bad these job boards sucked and how nobody should use them…

But then a few answers later, the craziest thing happened — I actually found a guy who had something good to say about Upwork.com.

This blew my mind as I think this was honestly the first positive review I’ve ever seen, so I immediately began reading his answer…

And looking back now, that’s really the pivotal moment in my freelancing career.

I’ll explain more throughout this guide, but let’s just say that one answer really changed my perspective on a lot of things…

Because he wasn’t yelling the traditional “wisdom”, talking about how you have to work hard, start with low rates, treat your customers like they’re your only customers…

But instead, he was saying things I’d never thought of before — like focusing on the underlying psychology of profiles, cover letters and niches…

Because once you do that and make a few small tweaks, things get a lot easier after that.

Fast forward a few weeks and after dropping $3K on courses, I learned the underlying principles he was talking about…

Then jumped back on Upwork to start finding clients, but here’s the funny part — I actually did a drastic pivot in the meantime.

What kind of pivot?

Well, as I mentioned a second ago, when I first started I decided to be a bookkeeper.

I did this because it was what I knew how to do (and had education to back it up)…

But after taking this guy’s course and learning all the underlying principles I needed to actually get jobs, I decided I was going to comeback as a copywriter.

Why copywriter?

I have no g’damn idea, I really don’t.

I never liked writing, barely passed college English and used to make fun of people who made a living off writing (because I didn’t believe it)…

So if I had to give a reason, I’d say it’s because I was so sick of getting shot down for bookkeeping jobs that I just wanted to try something else out, but again — I don’t know.

Anyway, with all that said…

4 days after making my comeback and setting up a new profile as a copywriter, the craziest damn thing happened…

I landed my first client, at $45/hr!

This was extremely exciting at first as I really needed the money and it was a huge sigh of relief, but after that initial euphoria wore off…

I couldn’t help but get bamboozled by the results.

I mean, I’d just spent months struggling to land a job in a field where I had my Master’s degree and 5 years of experience, plus I was only charging $25/hr…

And now I was landing clients in a field where I had zero experience and zero education, at a rate that was nearly 2x that much?

Mind-blown for sure, but at the same time — I really didn’t have long to think about it as I had to get started on the client’s project right away.

For the first 2 weeks I was working on his project a lot, getting everything in place and crafting the copy just like he wanted…

But after that initial 2 weeks was over, we finally reached a “steady” point to where I was just going to write one blog a week after that — giving me time to go out and find more clients.

This was really exciting at first as I wanted to see what kinds of other projects I could land, but at the same time — it was kinda scary as well.

I couldn’t help but think what would happen if I had to realize this one job was a fluke, crushing all my momentum (and dreams) along the way…

But I really didn’t have a choice, so I jumped on Upwork and applied to a few jobs after that.

The results?

Well, I applied to 6 jobs and got 3 offers (actually had to turn one down)..

And that gave me all the confidence I needed to take off and officially begin my journey as a full-time freelancer (well, one that was making full-time income anyway).

I was landing clients whenever I wanted:

And even decided to create multiple profiles (5 was my all-time high) for different niches, picking up different jobs in each and every single one of them.

Now I’ll talk about the importance of niches in a second, but first — I should probably mention that you never want to have more than one profile as it’s against Upwork’s terms & conditions…

Meaning they eventually caught me and threatened to shut down all my profiles (even though they let me keep one)…

But here’s the important part.

I don’t care what industry you’re in or what your current skill-level is, these underlying principles simply work.

I’ve used them to get jobs in all 12 categories (for myself and clients):

And even taught others how to do the same:

So long story short, if you apply the principles I’m about to give you — I promise you’ll see results that you’ve never dreamed of.

Ready to get started?

Mistake #1 — Not having a niche

This is sad to admit now, but I honestly never heard of freelancing until like 2 months before I lost my job and had to figure something out.

I guess I was always under the impression that we had to simply get jobs at an office, go there everyday, collect paychecks and live for the weekends…

But after I was fired and decided I was never going to work for anybody again, I started Googling around — and within a short period of time, I’d come across a lot of things I’d never heard of before.

I was reading stories about how college dropouts were making $75/hr for “simple” skills (like web design), and even though I didn’t really believe it at the time…

I still enjoyed the thought of being able to work from anywhere and having enough opportunity to keep me busy for awhile (since I could work with any of the millions of companies located in the U.S.)…

So that’s what made me take the initial “leap” (hard to say when you don’t have any other options) and start putting my bookkeeping business together.

This was actually before I’d heard of Upwork as well, so I was still following the outdated guidelines of content marketing and cold email…

Which meant I’d need a website to bring people to, so I quickly signed-up for a Squarespace account and begin putting one together right away.

I started off by mimicking the local CPA firm’s website, thinking that’d be a good start…

But after doing this for a couple days, I realized they probably weren’t the best website to copy as I was trying to attract businesses that worked online, not physical locations like them…

So after that I decided to do a quick search for “virtual bookkeeping firms”.

Now I was aware I wasn’t the first one to have this idea, so I knew there was going to be a few other firms out there…

But holy hell, I didn’t not realize there was going to be this many.

I can’t remember how many pages of results came back after I hit enter, I just remember it being A LOT…

And that’s when I started to panic.

I started to worry about if I’d made a mistake, asking myself questions like:

  • Why would clients hire me over these existing firms?
  • Do I even have a shot?
  • Should I offer extremely low rates just to get my base up?

And every other question that most new freelancers ask themselves, until I came across a virtual bookkeeping firm that apparently only worked with dental offices.

This blew my mind at the time as I couldn’t understand why they would limit themselves to just dental offices, especially with all the other opportunity out there…

So I continued to look around their website for a good 20 minutes or so, and from what I could tell — it looked like they were doing well (they’d been around for 5 years and had 7 employees).

This made me think about their reasoning for a little while longer, and after being unable to wrap my head around it an hour later…

I decided to just say fuck it and email the owner, asking why he’d do this.

Deep down, I honestly didn’t think I’d get a reply because who wants to help a competitor?…

And I didn’t hear a word during the first 24 hours, or even the first 48 hours…

But on the 3rd day I received a response, and I’m not going to lie — it was a lot more than I expected.

I could tell the guy (his name was Josh) had put a lot of time and thought into his email, and to my surprise — he wasn’t trying to talk me out of starting a firm or anything like that…

But instead, he actually encouraged me to move forward with it, told me what rates I should charge, where he found clients, etc…

And after that, he jumped into the reasoning for choosing dental offices.

I can’t remember his exact reason now and the email was sent to an account I no longer have, but long story short — he said that in order for any business to survive online, you have to have a niche.

After that he went on to explain how niches were important because they eliminated 99% of your competition (all the generalists and other niches), along with a few other things…

And even though it kinda made sense what he was saying, I still couldn’t wrap my head around it so I decided to move forward with my bookkeeping firm (as a generalist)…

Never really thinking about niches again until I started the course I mentioned earlier (how to get jobs on Upwork) and in module 2, the guy started talking about shortcuts our brains use when making decisions.

Now apparently this guy had done a lot of studying in the field of ethical persuasion, and knowing these shortcuts is persuasion in the simplest terms…

But after he got through the first few shortcuts (i.e. social proof, authority, higher prices, etc)…

He began to talk about positioning, and how creating a niche was the easiest way to get clients to work with you over everybody else.

Now this obviously had my interest as I’d heard this before, so I really tuned in when he was speaking…

And he mentioned a lot of things during the entire 47 minute module, but in short — choosing a niche is important because clients don’t just care if you can do any project, they care if you can do their project.

This makes sense at the surface, but then he went on to explain that relevance is another shortcut our brain uses…

And the example he provided asked us to put ourselves in the shoes of a gym owner who was looking to hire a Facebook Advertiser for an upcoming campaign we had.

We were supposed to pretend that we went onto Upwork, posted a job…

Then logged in 3 days later to see that we had 24 applicants for the job, with 23 of them being generic “Facebook Advertisers” and 1 of them being a “Facebook Advertising Specialist for the Health and Fitness industry”.

Now I can’t remember the exact details other than that, but I do remember the one Health and Fitness Specialist only had minimal experience (like 2 reviews, although they were both stellar) and the rest of them had a lot of reviews, just none that were relevant to us…

And after seeing this lineup, we were supposed to pick which one we’d hire.

It was honestly a scary exercise because even though I knew what he was doing, I still couldn’t help but pick the 1 marketer who specialized in my field…

And after that, I became a firm believer of niches.

He gave us action steps to find our certain niche after that, and I’ll show you the exact exercise in a second…

But after doing this exercise, I decided I was going to become a Copywriter for Tax Firms.

Why?

Because I’d seen a lot of CPA Firms looking for writers, and I knew my knowledge of Tax would help me stand out from the rest of the pack…

And it did just that, helping me win nearly every job I applied for — even though 99% of the other writers had more experience and lower rates.

Did it limit my opportunities along the way?

Absolutely, and I think every niche will…

But at the same time, even though you have less opportunity — choosing a niche will skyrocket your conversion ratio (number of clients who want to work with you)…

So even though it seems counterintuitive, you actually get more jobs with less opportunity.

Action steps to fix this:

Step 1: Think about one freelance skill you’re going to do

I say this because in addition to not finding a niche, a lot of freelancers try to get all the opportunity they can get by specializing in multiple skills…

And that can work sometimes (i.e. Landing Page Copywriter and Designer), but most of the time — it does more harm than good (i.e. Accountant who develops mobile apps and specializes in Pinterest Marketing).

We can always worry about expanding out later, but for this exercise — try and pick one skill like:

  • Blog writer
  • Powerpoint Designer
  • Facebook Advertiser
  • Website Designer
  • Virtual Assistant
  • Logo Designer
  • Bookkeeper…

Step 2: Think about 3 things you’re interested in, and they don’t need to be from a business standpoint either.

Just write down the first 3 things that come to mind, and to give you an example of what I’d put, it’d be:

  • Ketogenic diet
  • Wine
  • Tax

Step 3: Start making combinations between the 2 categories and don’t worry if they seem weird, trust me, there’s some unique niches out there.

An example of mine would be:

  • Wine blogger
  • Website Designer for Tax Firms
  • Facebook Advertiser for Ketogenic Diet
  • Virtual Assistant for Tax Firms
  • Powerpoint Designer for Ketogenic Diet Courses
  • Etc, etc, etc…

And congrats! You’ve successfully created a niche that’s eliminated 99% of your competition (the generalists or other specialists), allowing you to cut through the noise and get jobs right away…

Pretty cool huh?

I know, it’s a simple concept that really does wonders…

Especially when you combine it with the 4 other mistakes we’re about to cover.

Mistake #2 — Not looking in the right places

After I picked my niche and knew I was going to become a copywriter for tax firms, my job searches got a lot quicker as I knew exactly what I was looking for…

But one thing continued to bug me, it just didn’t seem like there was AS MUCH opportunity out there.

I mean yes, I knew there was going to be less opportunity as I was targeting a smaller market…

But the thing that surprised me was how big of a difference there was between all the bookkeeping and copywriting jobs (in general), especially after I’d heard how copywriting was one of the highest demand skills out there today.

I guess this really didn’t bother me at first as I was still getting jobs and didn’t need more opportunity, so I just forgot about it for awhile…

Until the day I was out to lunch with an ex co-worker, and after we got through the small talk — she immediately jumped into my new career and asked what in the hell copywriting was?

I laughed at first as I’d never heard of it before either, so I could see why she was confused…

But then once I started to explain it to her, I realized I still really didn’t know how to describe it.

I kind of stumbled through and told her it was the “language of business”, then gave her the “it’s complicated” phrase to weasel my way out of explaining it any more…

Which worked for that moment, but after I got home — I still couldn’t wrap my head around the fact that I didn’t even know what my skill was…

So I quickly jumped on Google and searched “what is copywriting?”

Funny enough, the first 5 articles were from fellow copywriters who’d apparently been asked this question so many times they decided to create blogs explaining it, but I really didn’t want their definition…

So I kept scrolling down until I hit Wikipedia, and after clicking on it — I came across the definition of:

“Copywriting is the act of writing text for the purpose of advertising or other forms of marketing”…

And that’s when the light bulb turned on.

Here I’d just spent the last month looking for jobs in the “writing” category, because I viewed copywriting as writing (and rightfully so)…

But after seeing the definition of this, I immediately realized that clients looked at it a different way — putting it in the marketing/advertising category.

After realizing this, I jumped back onto Upwork and included “sales and marketing” into my job search as well…

And I guess I don’t really have direct numbers that I can pull for this, but if I had to guess…

I’d say this one simple tweak easily put an extra $20K in my pocket.

Why?

Because I uncovered a crazy amount of opportunities that I’d never seen before.

It seemed like every client looking for a copywriter wasn’t looking in writing, but instead, they were in sales & marketing…

Giving me enough opportunities to ALWAYS be busy, even with my defined niche.

Action steps to fix this mistake:

After working in every category, I can confidently say this happens with every skill out there…

Making it important to always think about things from the client’s point of view as well, no matter what industry you’re in.

Common examples of this would be:

  • Copywriters need to include Writing AND Sales/Marketing
  • Bookkeepers need to include Accounting AND data entry
  • Landing page designers need to do Web Development AND Sales/Marketing (trust me, I see postings for that all the time in there)
  • Video editors need to do Design/Creative AND Sales/Marketing…
  • Etc, etc, etc…

Does this mean you’ll have some extra jobs to skim through (that might not relate to you)?

Absolutely. I’m constantly seeing things like landing page design, pinterest marketing, etc…

All things that might not relate directly to me, but when you have a niche it’s easy to skim past these — meaning you’re sacrificing 30 extra seconds for a crazy amount of uncovered opportunities.

Mistake #3 — Having a generic ass headline

When I first started putting my profile together on Upwork, I had no idea what it should look like…

So like most new freelancers, I started looking around at other freelancers profiles to see what I should do.

There was a lot of interesting headlines in the bookkeeping field, mainly because it seemed like most bookkeepers specialized in a little bit of everything:

“Bookkeeping/Graphic Design/Social Media Consultant”

But after scrolling through plenty of profiles and getting a good idea of the ones I liked, I decided to keep it short and sweet:

“Financial Analyst with over 5 years of experience”

I liked this title as it made me an advanced bookkeeper (i.e. Financial Analyst) and showed I had plenty of experience, so I kept it like this for the next couple months (or however long I was still a bookkeeper) and didn’t change it until I began taking my course…

Then in the module where he was going over persuasion (brain shortcuts), the instructor started talking about “herd mentality”.

Now I’d never heard of this at the time, but I’ve done A LOT of research into it ever since then…

And long story short, herd mentality is one of the many shortcuts our brain uses (by default) to conserve energy and make decisions faster.

How?

By thinking that if everybody else is doing it, then it must be the right thing to do…

And even though that might be true sometimes, there’s also a lot of times where this can be harmful (like smoking in the 70’s).

After that he went on to explain that even though modeling (i.e. copying others) can be a great way to start, it’s the worst way to stand out from the crowd, because well — you’re merely blending in with everybody else by copying them.

Like many of the other things I learned during this time, that literally blew my mind as I knew exactly what he was talking about…

But never realized this until he said it, so after seeing how my headline was doing more harm than good — I immediately began writing down different ideas I could use to stand out.

I thought of a lot of absurd headlines at first, really just trying anything I could in order to be different…

And after coming up with a bunch of tacky ideas like:

  • Amazing bookkeeper
  • Number nerd with experience
  • ***Experienced BoOkKeEpPeR***…

Out of nowhere, it hit me — clients don’t care about you, they care about what you can do for them.

And don’t take that the wrong way either, that’s not saying all clients are savages that only care about themselves…

But they’re just normal people, and whether we realize it or not — everytime we purchase something, we think about what it can do for us (not what it is).

Anyway, after realizing this — I started to slightly tweak my headlines, going from tacky to results based…

And even though I’ve used a lot of different ones over the years, my absolute best performing headline has been:

“I increase sales for CPA firms (with copywriting)”

This headline is not only powerful because it shows my positioning (Copywriter for Tax Firms), but it also shows what I do for them (increase sales)…

Helping me stand out from the generic headlines and land jobs a lot faster.

Action steps to fix this mistake:

Now that you have your positioning (i.e. niche) in place, start thinking about what main benefit you provide for your target market…

And after you have that in place, start creating different headlines to see which one fits best.

I always advise creating at least 3 as that gives you a few options to choose from, and the easiest way to get started on this is by following the simple formula of:

(niche) that (results).

So for example, if I was a bookkeeper I’d write down:

  • Bookkeeper for Gyms that saves you time and money.
  • Bookkeeper for Gyms that makes sure your bills are paid on time
  • Bookkeeper for Gyms that allows you to focus on the important things…

And after I had these 3 down, I’d go through and spice things up…

But just having them in front of you makes the process a lot easier, ya dig?

Mistake #4 — Remember who your profile speaks to

So by the time I chose my niche, revamped my headline and unlocked a hidden goldmine of hidden opportunities…

I was really on cloud nine.

It seemed like deals were getting easier to land and after a while I’d built up a constant stream of income, giving me enough confidence to move forward and purchase a premium copywriting course that I’d been looking at.

The first 2 weeks of this course were essentially an advanced review session, where I was building on top of principles that I’d already covered…

But then week 3 hit and we started talking about the importance of About Me pages.

Now I guess I knew these pages were somewhat important, as people obviously look at them…

But the scary part was how I knew enough to realize the headline should be client-focused, but for some reason…

I completely missed the fact that About Me pages should be as well, and instead — defaulted to the usual:

“I’m an experienced Financial Analyst with over 5 years of experience and have my MBA. I love numbers because….”

Yadda yadda yadda, all things the client could really care less about and does nothing more than bore them to sleep, scaring them away.

Anyway, after realizing the importance of About Me pages and learning to do them the right way…

I went back, turned my profile into a “hidden sales letter”:

And let’s just say, the results were absolutely amazing.

I honestly had so many job invites the next week that I had to periodically turn my profile off just so I didn’t have to go in and decline all them (good problem to have, I know)…

And after teaching dozens of students how to do this in my Kickstart Your Side Hustle course, I can confidently say it’s (nearly) impossible to teach this via text as everybody learns better from the video version (where I can break down the principles)…

But don’t worry, you can see drastic results without understanding how to create a hidden sales letter as well — and all you need to do is:

  1. Make sure you’re talking to the client. Remember, they don’t care about you — they care about what you can do for them
  2. Try and use “you” more than “I”. And again, this is a guideline — not a hard rule. If it sounds funny then don’t use “you” all the time, but it’s just a good guideline to have because if you’re using “you” more than “I” — then it’s essentially guaranteed to be a client-focused profile

Action steps to fix this mistake:

Read your profile out loud and try to process it from the client’s point of view.

Yes, you want to make sure you’re showing the client what you can do for them…

But do so in a way that’s focused on them, not on you.

(Use my example for reference, but please don’t copy it. Upwork doesn’t rank copied (or similar) profiles high, so you’re hurting yourself if you do).

Mistake #5 — Treating the cover letter as an actual cover letter

Last but certainly not least, the cover letter.

Now I don’t think I need to go into too much detail on how important the cover letter is, ESPECIALLY for new(er) freelancers (5 reviews or less)…

Because at that point in the game, your profile probably isn’t going to rank high enough for clients to see — and an impressive proposal is really your only chance of landing the gig.

I know, pretty obvious…

And I knew this in my early days of freelancing, but no matter what I did — I couldn’t find a strategic formula that actually worked.

I started off by using the traditional “cover letters”…

And after submitting 50 of those without seeing any results, I decided to start searching around…

Seeing if I could find any advice that’d help me stand out, then after roughly 20 minutes of reading different articles — I’d found the silver bullet I was looking for…

CREATING VIDEOS!

Man, I can’t tell you how excited I was to come across this idea…

And at the same time, I was actually surprised I’d never thought of it before.

It seemed so simple, yet effective…

So that afternoon I immediately began putting together videos for a bunch of job proposals that stuck out to me, and even though the entire process took FOREVER (recording the video, making sure it looked alright, sharing the URL in my cover letter, etc)…

I figured it’d be worth it, so after making 7 of these — I decided to shut my computer down and wait for the responses to come in.

1 day passed, nothing…

2 day passed, still nothing…

3 days passed, not a peep…

And finally, after waiting 8 long days…

I had to accept that these videos weren’t working for me, and I’d just wasted a good 4 hours putting them together.

This was very depressing as I honestly thought this was going to be the silver bullet I needed, but now I had to face reality and make a huge decision in my life:

  1. Give up on freelancing and go back to a job (I get the chills just saying that)
  2. Keep searching and hope I find something that saves my ass

As I’m sure you can guess, this was one of the few times where my arrogance paid off and I decided to go with option 2…

Which is actually the moment that led me to Quora and finally to the course that taught me what I needed to know…

And I’ll tell you all about it here in a second, but first, I want to get one major point across — never treat your cover letter like an actual cover letter.

Why?

Remember earlier when we talked about how this whole freelancing game is really just making small tweaks that help you stand out from the crowd?

Yeah, well when you can combine that with psychological tactics that actually work, then you have a dynamic duo that almost makes things unfair…

And that’s exactly what I used to go from struggling freelancer to landing gigs in all 12 categories, some of which I had zero experience in (I was getting jobs for clients):’

Sounds great, so how do you do this?

Like the hidden sales letter, there’s a lot of principles and underlying structure that take place — meaning it’s difficult to explain everything via text (I’ve tried, and my video course students have always done much better)…

But also like the hidden sales letter, that doesn’t mean you need all these to see improvements either….

And that’s why I wanted to show you 3 simple tweaks that WILL provide drastic improvements:

  1. Treat the cover letter like an opening conversation. This works well because every other freelancer is going for the sale right away, so if you can stand out and just get them to respond to you — then your chances of getting the job will skyrocket
  2. Talk (type) like a human. One of the key components with copywriting is simply writing like you’re talking, because well — that’s how our brains process information. In other words, nobody likes to talk to a robot…so just be human, and that’ll go a long ways.
  3. NEVER USE TEMPLATE (OR HYBRID) PROPOSALS. As somebody who both hires and works on Upwork, I can’t even start to explain how obvious it is when somebody uses a template proposal — and as I’m sure you’ve seen in some job postings, once a client detects this — they immediately decline your proposal.

Why?

Because nobody wants to be “just another number” and if you can’t show you’ve read their exact posting, then how are they supposed to know you can actually do the job?

This is why I always tell people to at least acknowledge that you’ve read their post, as that goes a long way and it’s really not that hard to do.

Even saying something like, “Hey there, I see you’re looking for a copywriter to create amazing copy for your Facebook Ads (and get more clicks)”…

Will help you stand out from the crowd, and following that up with a great cover letter afterwards is nearly guaranteed to skyrocket your acceptance rate…

And to give you a good idea of what they should look like, here’s 3 proposals that’ve generated over $6K for me:

Proposal #1: Long-term role at $45/hr (which was 2x higher than the competition)

Proposal #2: $1,500 for 15 hours

Proposal #3: Winning a job at 5x the budget

Action steps to correct this mistake:

Go through Upwork, find a few jobs you like…

Look at the winning proposals I posted, apply the simple techniques I mentioned — and watch your response/closure rate soar.

I know it probably sounds overly-simple, especially when you’re looking for a silver bullet to help you stand out from the crowd…

But trust me, as somebody who’s tried it all (video, professional cover letters, etc.) and won jobs in all 12 categories with the tips I just gave you…

I can confidently say these small tweaks will provide much better results.

Long story short…

After working with dozens of freelancers on Upwork and having some relative success myself, I know how tempting it is to look for silver bullets that’ll fix all your problems…

Or better yet, just blame it on Upwork/clients — but I can assure you…

Once you learn how to use simple tweaks and psychological principles correctly, things get pretty easy after that (and anybody can succeed, even if you don’t have experience — I’m living proof of that).

I hope this free report helped you identify the largest areas of mistakes, along with actionable steps on how you can start improving them today.

Sean Meyer

Written by

Direct-response marketer.

Welcome to a place where words matter. On Medium, smart voices and original ideas take center stage - with no ads in sight. Watch
Follow all the topics you care about, and we’ll deliver the best stories for you to your homepage and inbox. Explore
Get unlimited access to the best stories on Medium — and support writers while you’re at it. Just $5/month. Upgrade