How to play I’m Yours by Jason Mraz (For Beginner Guitar Players)

Most beginner guitarists want an easy, catchy and repetitive song to practice and have trouble finding them. Although most songs have some sort of riff in them, you can play a chord in the riffs place in the same key and it will fit. While I’m yours has slides and palm muting, you can play chords openly instead. The whole song is a total of 4 chords and is a great way to start practice chord shapes and swaps.

Credit: pluckandplayguitar.com

Above is the basic chord progression of the song. The far left line of each chord is the top E string of the guitar. The far right line is the lower E string on the guitar. The numbers represent your fingers; 1 being your index, 2 being your middle finger and 3 being your ring finger. In most tabs the numbers represent the fret that you need to play but in this case it’s representing your fingers.

C Chord
Credit: pluckandplayguitar.com

The first chord played is the C chord. Pictured above is how the chord should look. Your ring finger should be resting on the A string 3rd fret. Your middle finger should be resting on the D string 2nd fret. And your index finger should be resting on the B string 1st fret, This chord comes in on the first “done”. (Ex. Well, you done done me and you bet…) It is a repeating down pick pattern that is played at around 75 BPM. This tempo can change based on your play style and it is best to play along with the song and figure it out. This song as a whole is played at around 75 BPM with very little if no variation. The chord is repeated until he says tried. ( EX. I Tried to be chill…) Then the G chord comes in.

G Chord
Credit: pluckandplayguitar.com

The second chord played in the four chord progression is the G chord. Again pictured above is how the chord should roughly look. Your middle finger should be resting on the E string 3rd fret. Your index finger should be resting on the A string 2nd fret. And finally your pinky should be resting on the high E string 3rd fret. To switch to this chord from the C chord it’s easier to practice moving both your index and middle finger at the same time to their designation to help with muscle memory. After you get this down slowly start to drag your pinky to it’s spot at the same time until you can move all three fingers at once.

Am Chord
Credit: pluckandplayguitar.com

The third chord played is the Am or A minor chord. Your index finger is on the B string 1st fret. Your middle finger is on the D string 2nd fret. And your ring finger is on the G string 2nd fret. This switch, once you have it done, feels like your swapping to a G chord in some ways except you’re hinging your index finger instead of applying your pinky. Press your ring and middle finger together while swapping to their positions and practice hinging your index finger down into it’s spot while you’re squeezing your middle and ring finger together.

F Chord
Credit: pluckandplayguitar.com

The final chord played is the F chord. Your ring finger is on the D string 3rd fret. Your middle finger is on the G string 2nd fret. And your index finger is Barring, using the flats of your fingers, the 1st fret on the B and E string. This will likely be the hardest chord to learn and swap too as it feels like a completely unnatural position for someone who has never practiced it. While the ring and middle finger position is the same shape as a C chords, the barring of the 1st fret can be tough to learn. It’s best to practice moving your fingers starting from your index finger and then slowly adding the other two fingers until you feel comfortable.

Credit: pluckandplayguitar.com

Now that you’ve practiced the chord shapes and swaps, turn on the song and try to match your strumming with the chord swaps on the picture above!

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