7 Things To Know Before Building A Fence

When it comes to choosing a fence, most of us don’t give a second thought as to the practicalities of installation — we just see the end product and make our choices based on aesthetics and design.

Before making any decision on the type of fence you like however, you need to identify what it is you want your fence for. Do you just want it for aesthetic purposes or is there a more practical requirement? Is it for privacy or screening? Is it to keep a dog or other pets in? Perhaps it’s to add value to your property? Do you want to reduce noise or enhance your security? All of this information is important in determining not only the type of fencing you should choose, but what material is best suited for your needs.

There are other important considerations that have to be taken into account when choosing fencing — and the following seven points will help steer you in the right direction.

Know your limits
It’s vital that you confirm what restrictions or requirements are in place before you purchase any fencing. Most areas will have local rules determining fence heights, setbacks, coverage and materials and it is imperative that you understand what the limitations are upfront.

Walk the line
You may wish to have your property surveyed before installing a fence just to make doubly sure that you have the correct lines. Even if your neighbour is happy to have a fence erected without an official survey — it’s worth making absolutely sure about the lines because situations do change (such as the property changing hands and new neighbours moving in) and you can run the risk of having to take down and reposition the fence if it’s in the wrong place.

Understand the elevations
Changes in ground levels can make DIY installation a bit tricky, so it may be worth calling in your local specialist fencing company.

Locate underground utilities
Before you install your fence, make sure you won’t be sinking any posts into anything important like a sewerage pipe or gas line! You’ll need to closely inspect your property’s plans — otherwise check with the utility companies themselves to make sure that your fence won’t interfere with any sub-surface services.

Share your plans
The phrase ‘good fences make good neighbours’ was popularised by English poet, Robert Frost in his poem, ‘Mending Wall’ — and it remains true to this day. Discuss your fencing plans with your neighbour and make sure that he or she is on your side because a dispute can be costly and disruptive.

Clear the way
Any rocks, trees, plants or other obstacle will need to be dealt with before you installing the fence — so you should identify these and allow for them to be moved or removed beforehand.

Open the gate
Many people focus on the fencing side of things without paying too much attention to access points and gates. You should spend some time thinking about your gates and ask yourself some important questions, like do you want them to be self-locking and which way do you want them to swing? Also, it’s a good idea to have the ability to remove a section of fencing in case there’s ever a need to bring something large through or enable builders’ access.

Once you’ve ticked all the boxes, then it’s time to select the style of fencing that best suits your needs. A professional fencing company is your best bet as they will have all the answers when it comes to the right type of fencing materials for a particular situation, how to install the fencing and gates properly, how to treat the materials correctly and how to maintain the finished product optimally to ensure you get the best out of your investment.

If you’re looking for fencing in Perth, you should contact Secure-A-Fence, as their extensive experience and in-depth industry knowledge enables them to provide the right advice for any project. Visit their website to see their wide range of attractive designs, materials, colours and finish types or contact them on 08 9377 1917 for a friendly chat about what kind of fencing you want foryour property.

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