Obstacles that Hinder Architects from Living a Creative Life

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This article is seen at SEEMBU

You dreamed to creatively live a life where you could do everything you love. It would be a wonderful life if you could design a building which talks about your style, travel the world which you only seen in history books and live a lifestyle that really suits you.

However, we all have friends who consistently complain about the their life: attracting unwanted clients, living in the chaotic neighborhood, paying tons of debt and other reasons for consistently complain. Maybe, you also complain the life that you are awfully living right now.

Give yourself an hour to think why you were not able to live that creative life where you risk to achieve something. We will give you 3 obstacles that hinder you from thinking and taking action in fulfilling your dream life.

OBSTACLE 1: LACK OF DIRECTION

“Lack of direction, not lack of time, is the problem. We all have twenty-four hour days.” — Zig Ziglar
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Imagine yourself driving miles away from your home without determining your destination. You might end up getting exhausted, wasting efforts and getting lost. Most of the Architects would just accept projects from unwanted clients who just notice their existence. Since they haven’t thought of how they should be defined, what projects should they specialize or who are the ideal clients for their firm?

Thus, it is important for you to pause for awhile and ask yourself, “what kind of life you wanted to live?” and “what are your goals and mission in living your architecture life?” You might be an architect who specialized in restaurants, or a fashion architect or an architect traveler. Well, it is up to you to decide. Just define and determine the direction of your life.

OBSTACLE 2: FEAR OF CRITICISM

“Criticism may not be agreeable, but it is necessary. It fulfills the same function as pain in the human body. It calls attention to an unhealthy state of things.” — Winston Churchill
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We love being praised, yet we hate being criticized. Our brain is designed to love ourselves and avoid critics. Thus, we tend to do the safe procedures and standards. We never try to leap boundaries and test out our ideas. You have this amazing idea which could be included in the Top Architecture list or might be the ticket to Pritzker Award. However, chances are people will going to judge your idea as stupid, unrealistic or worst. As a result, you could feel loneliness, discouragements and live the life that miserable people ask you to live.

One thing you should always remember is that no matter how good or bad your idea, you should open to criticism as a factor for your growth. You always sort the constructive criticism and destructive criticism. Don’t let anyone stop you from doing what you love, just because of criticism. Embrace criticism and give the effort to improve, even 1% improvement every day.

If Frank Gehry dwelled on criticism for his crumpled like building or Zaha Hadid’s alien habitat building, we cannot see the existence of a new innovation of architecture.

OBSTACLE 3: FEAR OF FAILURE

“Only those who dare to fail greatly can ever achieve greatly.” — Robert F. Kennedy
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You hate failing. Failing is excluded in dictionaries for people who thought that life should always be a success. Indeed, failing is a moment that you decided to give up all your dreams and pivoted on the standard road of living. Failing is all we want to avoid. However, failure is inevitable and unavoidable.

Even the world’s most famous and celebrated architects have their failures, whether due to unforeseen consequences of an extraordinarily complex design or just plain shoddy construction. From the mold and cracks in Frank Lloyd Wright’s masterpiece Fallingwater to downright dangerous flying roof panels at Calatrava’s opera house in Valencia, these structural defects have led to injuries, lawsuits and in some cases, potential razing of a project before it’s even opened to the public. You can’t quite call these buildings outright failures just because they’ve got structural issues, especially since some of them are already iconic.

You should think that in life, we could lose in battles. Failing is really a part of our game. BUT, failure is a prerequisite to success. You just have to believe in what you are doing. If you fail, learn and make another strategy. If Starchitects failed and succeed, you could also have a successful creative life.