Part 4/10

Why you need a Hurdler in your team to see obstacles as opportunities.

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image:bbb.org

Welcome to Part 4 in this 10 part mini-series about the 10 faces of innovation. Part 4 looks at the role of the Hurdler in innovation. Hurdlers, quite literally, overcome obstacles by taking them in their stride. Driven by doing something no one has done before, these personas always find a new angle to attack an obstacle.

These are the people who don’t take no for an answer. Tireless problem solvers who aren’t afraid to break the rules — they learn to cleverly work outside the system. …


Part 3/10

How cross-pollinators are one of your biggest assets when it comes to innovation.

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image:rawpixel.com

Welcome to Part 3/10 — Introducing the Cross-Pollinator persona. Who are cross-pollinators? They are driven by curiosity, not just professionaly, with their open minded approach to life they are often the people who you also find the most interesting characters in the office.

You know the type? The very well-rounded individuals who have a million hobbies and interests. …


Part 2/10

Learn how to use low-fidelity, rapid prototyping to your advantage.

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image:quirky.com

Welcome to Part 2 of this 10 part mini-series. This time we are looking at the role of the Experimenter. So who are the Experimenters?

Well, classically you might recognise inventors within this persona. The people who love to build and test and try and try again until they eventually find something that works.

Let’s take James Dyson as an example, the global inventor turned billionaire and my old boss. He famously created 5,127 prototypes of his cyclone vacuum technology, before getting his first vacuum out in the market. This drive to find a better way of doing something and using prototypes to iterate his design makes Dyson, by definition, an Experimenter.


Part 1/10

Join me on this 10-part mini-series of the key takeaways from Tom Kelley’s wonderfully inspiring; ‘The Ten Faces of Innovation’ and how to implement them.

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imsge:rawpixel.com

As a long-time number one fan of IDEO there isn’t much that they’ve produced that I’ve not been inspired by. I taught myself design thinking 7 years ago and have been practising and tailoring it ever since. My copy of ‘The Ten Faces of Innovation’ has seen better days, to say the least, it’s a book I revisit 3–4 times a year to remind myself of its place when planning a design sprint.

I’ll be breaking down each of the 10 faces through a mini-series where I will summarise each persona and give some key pointers on how to integrate this in all your future innovation sessions. By using these personas you will become to understand which you feel mostly reflect yourself and that of your current team. In addition to understanding yourself better as an innovator, you’ll start to see which of the 10 personas you could make more use of. If you are missing an anthropologist, for example, you could use the following tips to tune into the mindset and start uncovering the insights that only an anthropologist would uncover. Allowing you to maximise all of the 10 personas to thus giving you a well-rounded approach to innovation. …


So what’s the deal with palm oil? It’s awful but it’s great, here’s why.

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Photograph from: Mattius Klum

I like many others, have been led to believe palm oil is a total disaster full stop but here’s the deal, it just depends on where it came from. I recently read on WWF’s website that boycotting palm oil all together would actually be a bad thing, and so I embarked on some research to get to the root of the issue and understand what is the deal with palm oil?

I avoided it in supermarkets for years, but it’s a little more complicated than just boycotting it all together. The key is in SUSTAINABLE PALM OIL. If a product label clearly states that it contains sustainably sourced palm oil, there’s no need to boycott them too. It means their palm oil plantations are not causing any more deforestation and they pay their workers fairly, protect wildlife and their activities adhere to accreditation guidelines. …


Demographic profiles and customer segmentation is flat and out-dated. Try using archetypes instead, and here’s why.

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image: rawpixel.com

We are all familiar with the classic Persona-based profiling we see in marketing meetings and design workshops. Flat, demographic data like age and spend are often used to pigeon hole consumers, and it just doesn’t work. Here’s Carol, she’s 41, has two point five kids, ‘the soccer mom’ profile. She drives a big, ugly SUV, she might even hit the trifecta of cliches and be a ‘home-maker’. Carol is used from company to company to put a face to some demographic data. Poor, misunderstood Carol.

It seems banal to even consider this is how companies look at customers, but it happens.


Why branding and strategy go hand in hand and the key steps to get there.

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Photo by Kristian Egelund on Unsplash

I was recently asked how I helped a juggernaut of a brand pivot to make sense for an entirely new category, without losing the essence of the core brand. …


Washing your clothes seems completely harmless & unrelated to pollution but it actually accounts for 35% of ocean plastic.

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image: intelligentliving.co

It’s been estimated that 35% of the worlds ocean plastic actually comes from clothing. We all know single-use plastic bottles are bad, so why is it that we aren’t aware the impact that our clothing has? Even though it accounts for over a third of the problem.

Just as the topic of conversation seems to have been almost invisible, so is the problem itself: Microfibres. Plastic microfibres are the result of synthetic materials breaking down over time. Synthetic materials are those which are not made of natural materials, something like cotton or silk, but instead are generally made of plastic. …


Washing your clothes seems completely harmless & unrelated to pollution but it actually accounts for 35% of ocean plastic.

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image: intelligentliving.co

It’s been estimated that 35% of the worlds ocean plastic actually comes from clothing. We all know single use plastic bottles are bad, so why is it that we aren’t aware the impact that our clothing has? Even though it accounts for over a third of the problem.

Just as the topic of conversation seems to have been almost invisible, so is the problem itself: Microfibres. Plastic microfibres are the result of synthetic materials breaking down over time. Synthetic materials are those which are not made of natural materials, something like cotton or silk, but instead are generally made of plastic. The plastic is made into a thread which is then used to make fabrics like polyester and acrylic. …


De-mystifying my elusive job title, what is a creative strategist?

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rawpixel.com

You’re sitting at a table of ten strangers, whether it’s a wedding or a dinner party, usually the first question beyond your name is ‘sooooo… what do you do?’

About

Selma Bambur

Designer, environmentalist, innovation strategist. www.selmabambur.com Writing about: Creativity, Innovation, Design, Environment

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