But listen to what Senator Sanders is saying.
Jay Parker (I)
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If we allow our government to decide which procedures and treatments are covered then we are essentially enabling bureaucrats to determine which procedures and treatments are medically necessary. Ultimately, as public access to private health care increases, government bureaucrats will ration care and place caps on the number of procedures available to an individual in a given year. Armies of lobbyists will then descend on Washington with suitcases of cash to influence politicians to prioritize their benefactor’s procedures, drugs and payment structures.

The ‘shinier’ hospitals offering revolutionary (and more expensive) healthcare treatment not sustainable under the capped, single payer subsidies will have no choice but to restrict their services to those who can afford it. As a result, privately offered supplemental insurance and other financial schemes will rise in popularity among the wealthy and large corporations seeking to incentivize employment. As more shiny hospitals privatize care, doctors will flee the horrors of single payer subsidized healthcare for the shinier healthcare providers who can pay their physicians more to treat fewer patients. Over time, the number of hospitals offering subsidized healthcare will decline and devolve into ‘deathcare’ clinics where patients die while waiting for their procedures to be scheduled.

In the end, private supplemental care will relegate the single payer healthcare solution to a system very similar to the Obamacare system we have now, but with much higher taxes. Taxpayers will eventually revolt and elect a populist outsider for president who will promise to repeal and replace the single payer healthcare system. Once elected, the new populist president will soon learn that Congress, including members of his own party, are so reliant on the additional tax revenue and special interest $$$ from the healthcare lobby that, instead of repealing single payer, they will modify it into a medicare-for-everyone-else program, returning private insurance companies to their former prominence of…..today.