By Rosemarie Truglio, PhD. Senior Vice President, Curriculum & Content, Sesame Workshop

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Play Cookie Monster’s Foodie Truck game with your child.

Enlisting your child to help prepare snacks and meals not only builds self-esteem and self-confidence, but math skills, too. As you cook, bake, or prepare snacks together, talk about how you are following the directions of the recipes and that you’re doing lots of math as you:

  • Use numbers to measure and weigh ingredients
  • Find different shapes together all around the kitchen, from plate circles to baking sheet rectangles to placemat squares
  • Talk about relational concepts such as big vs. small; small, medium, and large; or big, bigger, and biggest as you choose different-sized bowls and pans. Ingredients and cupboards can be open or closed, and you can teach fast and slow as you mix and…


By Rosemarie Truglio, PhD. Senior Vice President, Curriculum & Content, Sesame Workshop

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Video chat is a great way to stay connected to family and friends when you can’t see them in person. It’s sometimes hard for young children to stay engaged in a conversation over the screen, but playing games together make the experience more exciting and fun. Here are some game ideas that kids can play with friends and family on video chat.

Guess What’s in the Can

  • In this game, players have to guess what the person you’re video chatting with is holding just below their screen.
  • One player finds an item in the house. It can be anything — a spoon, a stuffed animal, a smelly sock, and holds it just off screen. …

By Rosemarie Truglio, PhD. Senior Vice President, Curriculum & Content, Sesame Workshop

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Skill Focus: Help Children Manage Emotions

Children are experiencing a wide range of emotions right now. It’s important for them to learn to express their feelings in a healthy way. Drawing is a creative way to learn feeling words and to share how we feel.

Draw Your Feelings

Encourage your child to draw “how they feel,” and use the pictures to talk about all the feelings — big and small — they’re having.

Using “feelings words” like frustrated, excited, angry, or worried helps build an emotions vocabulary and gives children a label for what they’re feeling: an important first step in managing a big emotion. …


Rosemarie Truglio, PhD. Senior Vice President, Curriculum & Content, Sesame Workshop.

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Skills focus: Healthy Exercise

Singing and moving to your child’s favorite songs is a great way to turn frowns, frustration, and fussiness into smiles and laughter — all while getting some much-needed indoor exercise!

Add to the fun with homemade musical instruments. …


By Rosemarie Truglio, PhD. Senior Vice President, Curriculum & Content, Sesame Workshop

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Skills Focus: Managing Emotions

Download the ‘Making a Glitter Jar’ instructions here.

What exactly is a glitter jar? Just what it sounds like: a simple, sealed jar filled with water and brightly colored glitter. When you shake it, the glitter whirling around the inside of the jar represents how your child is feeling inside. Have her watch the glitter swirl and take deep belly breaths while the glitter slowly drifts to the bottom. When it finally settles, the two of you will be able to see through the clear water, symbolizing that your child has achieved a calmer state and giving you the opportunity to talk about the big feeling she was experiencing. …


By Rosemarie Truglio, PhD. Senior Vice President, Curriculum & Content, Sesame Workshop

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Skills Focus: Managing Emotions

The Stoplight Game is a useful strategy for when your child gets frustrated facing obstacles or failure — and a great way to instill the “power of yet.” Make red, yellow, and green “lights” with construction paper, or have your child color in circles on white paper. Talk about what each color signifies, then use your homemade lights to signal what to do in different situations.

  • Red light: Stop and encourage your child to belly-breathe in order to calm down a “big feeling”
  • Yellow Light: Pause and make a plan. Once calm, help your child understand what the problem is and think about other ways it can be…


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Imagery supplied by FatCamera/E/Getty Images

Akimi Gibson, VP & Education Publisher, Sesame Workshop

First, to all early childhood educators: thank you for everything you do on behalf of children and families! We know how challenging it is to adjust to the new and evolving routines these times present, and Sesame Workshop is here to support you as we collectively navigate our “for now” normal.

Let’s take a moment to reflect on how we’re feeling and doing. Our teacher friends share that they miss the buzz and energy of their classrooms and the encouraging presence of their teaching team and colleagues — and they miss the children perhaps most of all. Everyone is coping with different challenges right now, and we can’t expect things to feel “fine” all the time. …


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Week #4 — April 13, 2020

Rosemarie Truglio, PhD. Senior Vice President, Curriculum & Content, Sesame Workshop.

As our “for now” normal becomes more routine, Sesame Workshop is here to support children and families with ideas for fun learning experiences you can create together at home. …


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Week #3 — April 6, 2020

Rosemarie Truglio, PhD. Senior Vice President, Curriculum & Content, Sesame Workshop.

Everyone is adjusting to a new routine these days — and Sesame Workshop is here to support families as we collectively navigate our “for now” normal. …


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Week #2 — March 30, 2020

Dr. Rosemarie Truglio, PhD. Senior Vice President, Curriculum & Content, Sesame Workshop.

Sesame Workshop is here to support families at a time when everyone is trying to create a new sense of normalcy. …

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Sesame Street

Helping kids grow smarter, stronger, and kinder.

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