The Unwilling Word

Harlem Hellfighter
Jun 16, 2017 · 4 min read

Sheba ‘Enl Ka raced down the crumbling stairwell made out of hard red stone to the blood colored halls of the palace. Nobody remained. Ashes fluttered about near the shattered remains of the windows; broken holes in stone walls. The great oaken doors of Nenor appeared to have been vaporized. Sheba saw little fragments of wood lying about the corridors. Her face collapsed into one of grief and horror. What had she done?

Tears flying from her eyes, she ran despairingly out the threshold to stare upon a sight that nearly broke her. The great and mighty city of Ka Senoa lay before her as a crumbled heap. Great towers that once touched the sky had fallen down to earth in defeat, crushing everything below. Huts and houses sat their foundations imploded and their roofs exploded. Beyond the city lay about a ten mile radius of downed trees all with their tops pointing away from the carnage, encircling the city.

Nothing could reverse what had transpired, for Sheba ‘Enl Ka had used The Unwilling Word.

For thousands of years The Word passed through the Royal family of Ka each generation at the age of 25. The Sacred Book, which contained The Unwilling Word at page 126, line three, word eight, was shown to the prince or princess, and then erased from the memory of the King or Queen. Nobody else in the world knew about the Word. If spoken The Unwilling Word would obliterate every trace of human civilization on the earth except for the person who accessed it.

Sheba En’l Ka was sixteen, and it was a hot summer day in the city. The only day that Sheba would soon come to remember. Sheba was in her room pacing, bored. Her father was out taking a walk in the gardens with Sheba’s mother, the Queen. It was midday, right after an uneventful lunch with her family, and Sheba was starting to lose her mind. As the princess, she should be entitled to have a lot more than simple peasants out in the city, but as she looked out of her window, why did she see all the inhabitants of the city all cheery? Why did she see the children playing among the streets, and the teenagers like her all hanging out together with companions, while she was cooped up inside the palace with no friends and only the servants to talk to?

Sheba decided to try and liven up her day, she would try to find out more behind her family. For all her time in this hell of a castle, she had not even found out what her father the King actually did in his job. What was every day like for him? The princess opened the door of her apartments and peered out, and she only saw an empty corridor. Sheba strolled down the long hallway, shoes clacking on the polished stone. Winding her way to the other side of the building, she passed several guards along the way, each of them only nodding to her, acknowledging her authority. With a regal posture, she pushed opened the double-doors of her father’s apartments and looked around her. Seeing if there was anything she could find interesting.

Bookshelves lined the walls on both sides of her, and a large rectangle shaped table in the center of room, between the shelves. At the far end of the room lay her father’s bed, silk sheets fluttering from the breeze that emanated from the window above it. In the center of table sat a gold pedestal, where a single old and tattered book sat, opened. The page that it was open to was dog eared and had three bookmarks in it. Finding it strange, Sheba strolled over to it confidently, an picked it up.

Telling from its worn appearance, the Princess was careful with it, afraid it would fall to pieces. She turned the book over in her hands, and saw that the cover’s color had faded from existence along with its words. Turning the pages, she could hardly read any of the text. All of it had faded into the paper. Going back to the page that was dog eared and bookmarked, she spotted a specific word that was circled with colored ink. Whoever circled it took no heed to people trying to read the text around the word, for it the ink was so thick it had covered at least three lines! As Sheba could see it, the word was pretty complicated, at least fifteen letters long. She tried a few times to pronounce it just for fun, then legitimately attempted. On the fifth try,

Boom.

The entire building was rocked. The ceiling above Sheba melted like it was made of liquid, the window above the bed shattered and glass shards went in every direction. Walls caved in, and the books all toppled from their bookshelves. The table in the center of the room split in half, and the rug on the floor cracked and crumpled. The chairs around the table disintegrated along with the paint and paintings on the walls. Sheba screamed as the apartment came crashing down around her. As she went to duck down, the floor beneath her broke, and she fell through the floorboards and crashed down a level to a corridor. Sheba curled into a ball and braced herself for anything that would be coming next. But then there was only silence. Then half of the palace collapsed.

Sheba heard a tremendous roar emit from above her, and saw clear sky above the hole where she had just fallen through. Then an insanely loud crash exploded through her ears. The Princess screamed and held her hands to her ears. When the crash had stopped, for it had lasted a good many seconds, Sheba could not hear over the ringing in her ears. A trickle of blood went down her cheek.

Now, as she sat there on the balcony sobbing, Sheba got up, looked around the ruined kingdom, and walked to a new life.

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