Image for post
Image for post

Take a moment and look into your past, find a moment where you’ve felt wrongly treated, felt misunderstood, felt discriminated against. I’m sure we can all find a time like that in our pasts, but let me help you with a hypothetical yet realistic situation:

Imagine you’re back in grade school and your teacher has a favourite student, and it isn’t you. Imagine that you, instead, were maybe deemed a trouble-maker; you are not sure why, but it just sort of happened and now here you are. Maybe it was that time you threw a rock at the sidewalk, or drew something lewd with your friends but you were the only one caught. It kind of sucks, the teacher doesn’t understand you and as much as you try to do well they still look at you suspiciously. It’s obviously frustrating: here you are, trying to learn, still growing and changing as a person, and there is someone in power looking down at you as if nothing has changed, as if you were doomed to be bad forever based off of some random thing you might have done as a kid, things that all kids do because they’re kids and don’t think that much. …


Image for post
Image for post

Went through a bit of a scare at the mall a few days before Christmas… a fight broke out and people thought there was gunfire, and all I saw was a crowd running towards me and screaming. We all hid in the various stores and closed the gates until it was declared safe.

This time of year is really hard on a lot of people. As I was feeling sorry for myself not being able to visit my family for the holidays, some people struggle to even get a meal on the table, and put themselves in debt to keep up with societal expectations. …


It hasn’t been long since I started calling myself a user experience designer; before now I was merely someone who was into reading, learning, and having a wide and strange variety of almost clashing interests. Though I haven’t changed that part of myself, I have come to realize that it is those parts of my personality that seem to matter the most when it comes to designing a user’s experience. We are all users ourselves after all, and we are all different kinds of people with all sorts of quirks, peeves, and methods.

When someone asks me what a user experience designer does for a website or application, I often relate it to a department store: when you go into a department store, you can often tell where you’ll find what you need without too much searching. There are visual cues, signs, and similar patterns to other stores (aka best practices). If the store is not created on this pattern, it has to help the customer along through more interaction and hopefully an intuitive and logical order, or else you’ll need a help desk at every section, and your security guards will end up knowing which corner you can find childrens’ shoes. At the same time, unless you’re a large department store, people might not have a reason to visit your store instead of the more well-known ones. You’ll need something extra, something delightful to get customers to show up and become regulars. This is the same with websites. We stick with best practices, try to formulate industry standards, and use similar iconography and copy to help the users more easily navigate through a website or application. …

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store