Fans of bondage and S&M report better mental health

Prompted by an article in the Mail Online, that well-known organ of rigorous impartial reporting and impeccable taste (otherwise referred to as “that right-wing scandal rag”), the NHS published the following article on the UK government website:

Fans of Bondage … report better mental health

Results of Dutch research showed that “people who engaged in BDSM appeared (my italics) to have a good mental health profile, and compared to control participants were:
* less neurotic
* more extraverted
* more open to new experiences
* more conscientious
* less sensitive to rejection
* had a higher sense of well-being”

Amusingly, the article includes several disclaimers:

“However, we don’t know how other Dutch BDSM participants (or the rest of the world) are faring. It could be that the people who chose to take part in the survey represent those with the best sense of health and well-being.”

“The Mail Online’s headlines that ‘bondage could be good for you’ and ‘S&M enthusiasts are healthier’ are not supported by this survey. A more accurate, if slightly less arresting, headline would be ‘people who choose to take part in an S&M survey claim to enjoy better psychological health.’”

(This theme continues in the discussion in the conclusions).

The research also found that BDSM practitioners were ‘less agreeable’ then control participants … “they were less likely to get on with friends, family members and co-workers”. But you knew that, right?

(from December 2014)

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