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Darryl Fears has been a reporter at The Washington Post for 20 years and has been covering the environment for the last decade.

Born and raised in Tampa Bay, Florida, Fears attended a segregated school until sixth grade and studied art at St. Petersburg College. He fell in love with journalism once he joined the school’s newspaper but found that there weren’t many opportunities for a young African American man to become a reporter in Florida. In 1981, Fears began studying at Howard University where he majored in journalism and minored in both English and history.

Fears has covered wildlife, climate change, natural disasters, environmental racism, and so much more. He also has written about race, immigration, and the criminal justice system for The Washington Post, bringing extensive experience from his work at The Los Angeles Times, the Detroit Free Press and as the city hall bureau chief for The Atlanta-Journal Constitution. Recently, he and the team of climate journalists at The Washington Post won the 2020 Pulitzer Prize for Explanatory Reporting for the “ 2°C: Beyond the Limit “ series, which breaks down how quickly the planet is warming and the resulting consequences. Fears’ story focuses specifically on Australia and how rising temperatures are threatening not only essential natural resources but an entire culture struggling to survive after centuries of persecution. …


Nurse Amy Bucklen spends 12 hours a day in Kanawha County racing between IV pumps, ventilators and warming beds in a neonatal intensive care unit filled with newborns struggling to withdraw from opioids and other drugs.

It’s the crying that bothers Bucklen most. Her tiny patients, she said, often cannot be consoled.

“A baby in withdrawal is always pretty pitiful,” said Bucklen, a mother of two girls. “They have this really high-pitched scream that is just unbearable to hear. It is the worst sound that I’ve ever heard in my life.”

Bucklen is among hundreds of doctors, nurses and nonprofit workers who have been pushed onto the front lines of the drug epidemic in West Virginia, scrambling to treat a generation of babies suffering from prenatal exposure to opioids and other drugs. …


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It’s easy to feel overwhelmed by the current pandemic. The world has gotten to the point where we all know at least one person who has been diagnosed with COVID-19. On top of that, so many things we take for granted have been disrupted, from graduations to birthdays to just going to work every day. However, there are some things that don’t have to be put on hold. On April 22, multiple organizations hosted events online to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Earth Day to continue advocating for a cleaner and healthier world.

Like the pandemic, climate change can feel like a massive, impossible problem that we as individuals have no control over. Fortunately, just like how people all over the world choose to wear a mask and socially distance from others every day, you have the ability to make an impact on the environment from the safety of your home. …


By C.K. Hickey and Shayna Greene

Visit https://foreignpolicy.com/2019/11/08/2020-presidential-election-democratic-candidates-national-security-employees-contributions/ to see the charted data

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While former U.S. Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Elizabeth Warren top most 2020 presidential democratic primary polls, the candidates of choice for most national security employees are Sen. Bernie Sanders and Mayor Pete Buttigieg.

Foreign Policy examined how much money was donated to campaign committees from employees of the State Department, the military, the Department of Homeland Security, and the Justice Department, drawing on data from the Center for Responsive Politics. When combining contribution amounts together, Sanders is the biggest beneficiary of national security support, followed by Buttigieg and Warren. …

About

Shayna Greene

Multimedia and freelance journalist: https://www.linkedin.com/in/shaynagreene1/

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