July 27, 2018 / Sheila M. Good, Author/ Edit

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ANNABEL SMITH

Check out the article, Self-Editing for Fiction Writers: A Quick-Start Checklist from the AutoCrit Blog for this quick and simple start to self-editing.

1. Clean things up:

  • Clear out the clutter.
  • Weed out “to be” verbs and other passive constructs.
  • Eliminate clichés

2. Check Narrative Flow

  • Show, don’t tell.
  • Find and eliminate redundancies.
  • Vary sentence lengths.
  • Pace yourself.

3. Dialogue

  • Get rid of excess dialogue tags.
  • Stick to “said” and “asked.”
  • Keep adverbs out of dialogue tags.

4. Plot

Evaluate your character development, conflict, action, and theme.

I’ve listed the main points on the checklist, but to get the details, you’ll need to read the article. If you’re ready to begin self-editing, need help or a little direction you can test AutoCrit for free

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AutoCrit.com

Learn How AutoCrit Works | View Pricing


We have all had our heartstrings tugged with the images of children this week, and as a mother I cannot imagine losing my child, even for a day. Emotions have gotten so out of hand, it’s becoming dangerous.

Immigration, particularly illegal immigration is a serious issue in which we should all be willing to sit down and have a thoughtful discussion. In a civil society it is called a debate. You present your side, calmly and rationally, in a way to persuade me and I do the same. Usually, in a good debate, both parties learn something and give a little, if not come together in agreement. That is not what’s happening today. …


June 22, 2018 / Sheila M. Good, Author/ Edit

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When I began blogging, I will admit I had no idea what I was getting into. I just wanted to write.

I discovered a few things along the way:

  • Blogging is hard work.
  • It takes time, lots of time.
  • Blogging and writing my novel was a difficult balance.

P. S. Hoffman has written a great article on this very subject. 5 Ways an Author Blog Could Kill Your Writing (and What to Do Instead). Here are some highlights.

  1. Blogging is a huge investment in time and effort.
  2. It robs you of valuable writing time. …


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When I began blogging, I will admit I had no idea what I was getting into. I just wanted to write.

I discovered a few things along the way:

  • Blogging is hard work.
  • It takes time, lots of time.
  • Blogging and writing my novel was a difficult balance.

P. S. Hoffman has written a great article on this very subject. 5 Ways an Author Blog Could Kill Your Writing (and What to Do Instead). Here are some highlights.

  1. Blogging is a huge investment in time and effort.
  2. It robs you of valuable writing time.
  3. If you want to write a novel, blogging teaches the wrong skills. …

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I’d love to hear your comments. Talk to me. Tell me your story. I’m all ears and look for me on Facebook at SheilaMGood, Pinterest, Bloglovin, Twitter@sheilamgood, Contently, and Instagram. You can follow my reviews on Amazon and Goodreads.

Originally published at cowpasturechronicles.com on June 13, 2018.


As I’ve said before, writing “The End” on the first draft is only the beginning of your work on the road to publication. One of the things I discovered, immediately after completing a 77,000 + word draft, is keeping up with the details, even with Scrivener, seems like a monumental task.

When did that character show up? Are the descriptions consistent? Does the timeline make sense? Do I need to name that character? Is the character necessary? And, so on. There are more details to keep track of than one imagine when you begin writing your story.

So here are a few spreadsheets I’ve come up with to help me. Feel free to copy the format, should you find these helpful. …


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Annabel Smith

I’ve tasted the victory of typing the last line on my first full-length novel. The exhilaration of writing “The end” lasted for about a day because now, therealwork begins.But, where do I begin?

To find out what my next steps involved, I started where I always do — with research and looking at what the experts had to say.

First, let’s look at a few definitions and terms — Here’s what I discovered:

Revision- means to you take a second look; read it through with fresh and critical perspective.

  • includes reviewing and amending the story.
  • is nota one-time run through.
  • often requires a back and forth between drafts. …

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@sheilamgood

Fan Favorite Award[/caption]

It’s hard to believe it’s been almost a year since I participated in the ChapterBuzz 10K Social Writing Challenge to work on my novel, Hello Hell.

It’s been an honor to meet so many talented writers and read so many extraordinary books. Thanks to Timothy Pike for the lovely feature article on my participation. Read it here, As a writer, how do you overcome paralyzing self-doubt? This author knows how.

Then, get your pencils sharpened, your paper ready, and hop on over to sign up for the upcoming 10K Social Writing Challenge beginning March 1st!

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Please check out my novel, Hello Hell on ChapterBuzz, now up to 62, 861 words, as well as, all of the other award-winning books by an ever-growing list of talented writers.


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@sheilamgood

If you read nothing else, read Duck-Face for the Deceased by kalanleitch.

A Friend and often guest blogger here in the Cow Pasture takes an honest look at how we communicate condolences on the day of tragedies, whether a local, state or worldwide event.

I realize people mean well, but so often we get caught up in the social media bombardment of the moment. We feel bad. We want to do something, offer our expressions of concern, sympathy, or comment on the “trending sentiments”.

But, stop for just a moment and think before jumping on the bandwagon. Is there a better way? Could you send a personal, hand-written note? Call and ask what they might need? Donate? Send flowers? …


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If you remember much from your school days (which is getting harder by the year for this fence jumper) you’re familiar with Newton’s Third Law of MotionFor every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction (a force when an object interacts with another interaction).

For example, if I throw a rubber ball against the wall in anger, the wall is gonna push back and one of several things will happen: 1) I’ll catch it; 2) I will miss it and it will crash into my antique lamp; or 3) it will fly back and sock me in the nose (the most likely scenario). That’s a silly example, but you get the drift. …

About

CowPastureChronicles

Sheila McIntyre Good — Nurse turned Writer. Booklover, author, loyal friend, wife and mother.

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