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There aren’t many upsides to the Covid-19 pandemic but increased social cohesion is one. Now, it’s time to build on it, extending our concern to local communities and ensuring they can adapt and survive the new normal.


We’re living through a 21st-century gold rush where information is the new currency and the data-miner is king. And as the world emerges from its hole post-Covid-19 shutdown, smart data management will be vital to meet the challenges of the “new normal.”


The requirement for more space is driving city pioneers around the World to reexamine how space is utilized, reclaiming it back from vehicles, and giving it to people to walk, to meet, to work out, or to just sit.


A number of cities are trialing different incentives to reduce car numbers. However, there is no ‘silver bullet’ and viable alternatives must be in place for initiatives to succeed.


As awareness of the climate crisis grows, so does scrutiny of the aviation industry, a sector that has seen huge growth over the last 20 years. However, while many look to the skies for solutions, opportunities also exist on the ground to make airports more sustainable.


A new breed of transportation has revolutionized urban mobility in the last decade. Based on cutting-edge digital technology and backed by big money, on-demand upstarts have quickly become household names. Offering fast, flexible, affordable door-to-door solutions, they’ve disrupted a dinosaur of an industry and caught incumbents and authorities napping.


Mobility-as-a-Service (MaaS) could be the one of the keys to breaking our addiction to the car. It’s being tested in several cities, but uptake varies greatly and there’s a lot of work to do before its full potential is realized.


Our modern cities are becoming “knowledge economies”; Economies where products and services are produced through intellectual knowledge. Cities should function as hubs that encourage innovation. For a city to be truly productive, all citizens need to have equal access to what’s on offer. The only way to do this is to create reliable transport links.


As urban populations grow, city planners need sustainable mass transit solutions that save, but don’t cost, the Earth. Could Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) hold the key?


Walk down any street in any major city today and it won’t be long before you come across a shared scooter, a sidewalk bicycle station or an on-demand taxi, all of which are accessible through just a few app-enabled touches. Transport is changing and getting around is becoming increasingly more user-focussed. But, what impact does this all have on the already established modes of public transport within our cities? And how will city and transportation planners integrate and legislate for these new modes so that they become a reliable part of our future cities?

Shotl

Shotl On-demand Bus is a mobility platform that matches multiple passengers headed in the same direction with a moving vehicle.

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