Experience Design at Coldplay

  1. Unobtrusively engaging: One would think that a band changing colors on your wrist would constantly or at least frequently have your attention and be a distraction. On the contrary, I barely looked at the band a couple of times during the 2 hour long performance and was yet constantly aware of its state. It is indeed a beautiful sight, seeing your band light up on the wrist of thousands of others and looking upon the crowd only to see yourself.
  2. Feeling connected: Seeing an ocean of synced lights all around you is a very non-conspicuous yet brilliant way of not only acknowledging the masses around you but also invoking a feeling of one-ness with the crowd while doing so. Additionally, audience encounters a unique feeling of having contributed to the beauty of it.
  3. Focus: The bands glowed in a multitude of manners. Sometimes the colors gradually changed from yellow to magenta and other times it just flashed myriad colors randomly. A slow song like ‘Everglow’ had steady lights and something upbeat like ‘Something just like this’ had the lights flashing. At times the bands stopped glowing, which was the subtlest way of making the audience focus at the only source of light — the stage — where the fireworks went off. Surely, one wouldn’t have missed the fireworks if the bands kept glowing — nonetheless, it is an ever so gentle way of saying, ‘oh, look at the stage, something’s about to happen’.

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Siddhartha Bhagwan

Siddhartha Bhagwan

Masters student of Human Computer Interaction at the University of Maryland, College Park.