Service designer, wannabe System designer. I design for systemic change by tackling systematic behaviours. Follow more here: https://www.instagram.com/ifttw/
Header of article — Part 3 Towards sustainable virtuouos loops of innovation
Header of article — Part 3 Towards sustainable virtuouos loops of innovation
In this third and final part, we’re testing prototypes and explain how they allow virtuous innovation but are less desirable.

This is the last publication about the Master's research I’ve conducted when studying in 2018 at Hyper Island in Manchester. In the first two publications, I’ve respectively explained why autonomous vehicles onboard experience is likely to reinforce behaviours harmful to society and what design requirements we should adopt to empower users.

In the first article, I explain that autonomous vehicles are a solving business problems, not people problems. This focus frames the research and the definition of “good solution”. It prioritises business interests to users and society wellbeing. …


The case of autonomous vehicles.

Header of article — Putting humans at the centre of innovation
Header of article — Putting humans at the centre of innovation
In this 2nd part, we’re exploring ways to put people at the centre of innovation by focusing on ways to empower them.

Hi, it’s me again. A few weeks ago I published the first part of my Hyper Island master thesis about the potential impact of autonomous vehicle’s onboard experience on its users and society at a large scale.

In the first part, I deconstructed how radical innovation processes, in this case for autonomous vehicles, are framing the end-user experience, eventually impacting society at a large scale. I explained that by supporting researchers to build autonomous vehicles, businesses are inputting viability requirements. With those requirements in mind, engineers and designers are focusing on solving business problems, over-seeing the impact it has on users and their experience. By doing so, we’re reducing the area of possible futures, displacing already existing negative behaviours (isolation and axiety in mind) and their societal repercussion (polarisation, violence, burn-out and so on) into new territories. At some point, we will have to either solve or cater for those issues (antidepressants, new laws, etc.) …


From pleasure oriented decisions to efficiency driven behaviours.

(Originally published on Veriteer’s blog — Amended 09/2020)

From tracking time spent on activities, to managing food intake, relationships for networking purpose, or even listening to resumes of key ideas rather than reading books, the cult of efficiency shifts the way we behave and consume. Efficiency obsessed consumers are shifting away from pure emotional decisions (“I love running so I run”) to a near-obsession with maximising rational benefits (I need to be in shape, so I run X miles a day and I set goals I need to reach), which Peloton tried to transcribe (on top of other diminishing behaviours).

Screeshot from Peloton ad, showcasing a woman taking a selfie on an in-door cycle
Screeshot from Peloton ad, showcasing a woman taking a selfie on an in-door cycle
Screenshot from Peloton advertising for Holiday season in the US

Think of this as the cult of efficiency -– the way the way the quest to be the best version to ourselves according to social standards drives the need to maximise ourselves. …


How denaturising user-centricity is harming your business

User centricity is a key topic in today’s businesses. So much that it’s almost a buzzword that it’ll ASAP be a no go in a Brainsto’. Truth is, user-centricity is not only relevant, but important. Misunderstand your users or try to force them to go into a direction and they’ll find a way to hack it in the best case, or just leave in the worst. What do I mean by hack it? Well here’s an example:

Nokia N3310 with SMS text language
Nokia N3310 with SMS text language
SMS language is a good example of how people hacked a frustrating experience. For the younger reader out there, after a certain number of signs, carriers would charge a second message (like twitter basically), people started to use SMS language to reduce the amount. (It also improved convenience as we needed to click multiple times on the keyboard to type a single letter.)

Using user-centricity badly is harming the principle of understanding your users. This isn’t about asking whether or not they like/want something but assessing if they need it and understanding if and how you should deliver it to them.


The case of autonomous vehicles.

Header for the article — Designing issues by designing solutions — Deconstructing systemic biases
Header for the article — Designing issues by designing solutions — Deconstructing systemic biases
In this 1st part, we’re talking about systemic biases implemented by the innovation procress and how it impacts onboard user experience.

Part 1 — Deconstructing systemic biases

During his 2018 Peace Nobel Price acceptance speech, Denis Mukwege states “When you drive your electric car; when you use your smartphone or admire your jewellery, take a minute to reflect on the human cost of manufacturing these objects”. He refers to the social and political situation in Congo, and how by using a mode of consumption relying on electricity and batteries we are encouraging this situation.

While the scientific community is trying to attract attention on the imminent danger of global warming, partially caused by CO2 emission (Nasa), governments are taking actions in favour of electrical mobility. Among those policies, grants to purchase electric vehicles and investments to develop charging infrastructure network are among the most popular. However, this situation is converging toward a heavy reliance on Congo and creates its own impact on ecology and local population by draining minerals, creating its own recycling problem and relying on a dictatorship exploiting its population. This situation highlights a naked solutionism mindset in innovation. We could summarize it as following: By solving issues of today, we are creating the ones of tomorrow. …


[Written in September 2017 for Altavia Blog — Edited and Published in 2019]

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https://www.mon-marche.fr/

Consumers are increasingly demanding when it comes to food.
According to the ANIA (French National Food Industry Federation)/Opinion Way Barometer 2015, food is the very last items where French households want to reduce exepenses.
They are also paying more attention to the quality of what they eat: ingredients and nutritional value went up 18 and 4 points respectively as item to decide compared to 2013. This was at the expense of price and use-by dates, which went down 7 and 13 points respectively in comparison to 2013. According to the CSA Research survey for Agence Bio published in January 2017, 83% of French people trust organic products. …


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From “The Fascinating Story Behind Waitrose

Ask around you, the major difference between superstores and local shops is the relationship between consumers and staff. Brands have investigated social networks to provide advice and recommendations and have worked on the in-store experience to support omnichannel journeys.

However, despite their efforts and, except in rare occasions, social and retail networks operated in silos. According to a Harris Interactive study, 62% of consumers use social networks to search for product information, 58% read reviews, and 51% search for special offers. Social networks are therefore a major element of the shopping journey. …


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Shamelessly stolen from WSJ “Can Zero Waste Grocery Stores Make a Difference?”

[Originally written for Altavia’s Blog in June 2017, updated in 2019]

According to Social Food, 79% of French people in 2017 think that food can cause health problems.

So they look for certification and methods of consumption that give them control over what they eat.

According to Social Food again, 65% of them eat ORGANIC products on a regular basis. In addition to this, out of the 60% of French people who think that the Made in France label is a guarantee of quality, 75% favour Made in France for their food.

This new relationship with food has an explicit impact on communication, as is shown by the Fleury Michon campaigns and the “new” green McDonald’s branding. However, new food consumption trends are taking longer to be translated into the retail experience. Which raises the question, what impact do new food consumption trends have on retail? …


(Originally written in 2016 and translated from french in 2018)

Chatbots, those robots that enables people to have conversations with computers, and for the best of them, which also includes machine learning, are the buzzword of those last years.

Burger King, Facebook, Foursquare (Marsbot), CNN, L’express, Quartz, to name a few, are already rolling up chatbots.

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Why those services are capable to revolutionize purchasing?

Starting from the beginning:

Everyday, tones of text messages are sent. We are so used to SMS that every New Year Eve, the network shuts down by being overbooked.

We are in a SMS communication era. We meet people through text messages (Tinder conversations start with a message), we keep up through SMS, Messenger, WhatsApp, we find work through SMS etc. …

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