A Case for Life Coaches and Self Help Books

I have gone to a life coach and I am a devout self help book reader. If you’ve judged me by my last statement, then you should stop reading now. Also, you’re an asshole.

There’s constant pressure from the world to make something of ourselves — make sure to pay back student loans, get that job, make that money, be cool; all while trying to wash away the millennial stereotype. We are entitled, they say. We don’t know the meaning of hard work or the value of money, they continue. That’s a load of shit.

Why did I go to a life coach?

Because the world is a new version of itself here in the 2010s. The digital era has arrived in all its glory and we, the millennials, ushered it in along with our puberty. Cities are moving faster than ever, markets are changing at a rate that makes my head spin, top that off with an imploding personal life and momma needed some help.

An English-speaking therapist in central Israel costs as much as my monthly grocery bill, so it was either food or sanity — I chose to food (naturally). I then came across a life coach who had advertised that she had openings in her schedule, so I jumped on the opportunity and tried it out. A life coach, at least here, is cheaper than a therapist and approaches things differently.

Over the course of six months, she and I met every other week. She would send me home after each session with homework to do — exercises in positive thinking, affirmations, meditation and deep emotional exploration. It. Was. Terrifying. But effective. I learned how to manage stress better, analyze (but not over-analyze) my thoughts, identify repression of feelings and basically function like my tin heart got a hit of WD-40.

Self help books?

They’re the oil that keeps this machine running. When I say self help books, I’m talking about any book that discusses the matter of positive thinking, inspirational stories, and advice on the matter of success and failure, whether professional or personal. The book that got it all started for me was Jen Sincero’s book, You Are a Badass: How to Stop Doubting Your Greatness and Start Living an Awesome Life. I picked it up in one of those shops that has a combination of clothing, accessories, jewelry, home goods and random other items. Her methodology of improving ones life made sense to me. While, generally speaking, much of the book deals with positive thinking, she isn’t telling you that everything will change if you just sit there and think happy thoughts. She discusses proactive ways to get what you want.

My next read is #GIRLBOSS by Sophia Amoruso. This isn’t a typical ‘self help’ book, it’s self help to me, though. It’s all about inspiration to kick ass and take names as you make your dreams come true. Since I foresee some pretty big changes in my own life in the months to come, positive vibes are exactly what I need.

Both the life coach and these books built a strong foundation for my psyche, one that was built over a previously broken one that I was functioning with. There are so many causes for negative thoughts and stress in our lives, dealing with them as they come our way in the healthiest way possible will make it so they don’t pile on a become too heavy to deal with.

Originally published on Stark Mirror.