Socal UX Camp 2014: Recap

Yesterday, hundreds of designers, project managers, and developers gathered to talk about user experience and technology at Fullerton University. I’ve listed the session resources below.

Sessions I attended:

Discuss Design Without Losing your Mind (Keynote) — Aaron Irizarry @aaroni thisisaaronslife.com

If you only listen to one of these talks, let it be this one. Irizarry discusses the best ways to critique a design, deal with difficult people, and transfer those skills to everyday life.

Getting feedback from clients, teams, and stakeholders can be terrifying. We’ve all had our designs berated during painful meetings that result in nothing actionable or useful.

This presentation will provide tips and techniques for improving the conversations you have surrounding design with your teams, clients, and organizations.

Re/Frame Problems to Uncover Solutions — Shri Jambhekar shrijambhekar.com/

Use the Osborne method to reframe a difficult problem.

Original Question:”How to get fans to go to the Chivas games?”

Modify: Change perception of soccer as anyone can play, anywhere

Magnify: Add a tailgating event

Minimize: Live Stream the soccer games

Substitute: Host community games or tournaments

Rearrange: Make the games exclusive

Combine: Do a double sport event such as football then soccer

Reframed Question: “How to get more people interested in soccer?”

The technique did help our group find many solutions that we wouldn’t have thought normally. Use these worksheets (worksheet1 and worksheet2 ) or review this powerpoint to learn how to use the Osborne Method.

Accessible UX

Joseph Han O’Connor — @accessiblejoe accessiblejoe.com

I didn’t know what to expect in this presentation, but I definitely found some humility. We should all be practicing some of these techniques in our designs to make the lives of many people easier. O’Connor shows the need for better design through disabled friends.

If you are in charge of user experience, development, or strategy for a web site, Accessible UX will help you make your site accessible without sacrificing design or innovation. Rooted in universal design principles, this presentation provides solutions: practical advice and examples of how to create sites that everyone can use.

Slides: Accessible ux from Los Angeles Accessibility and Inclusive Design Group

Download the Audio.

Pixel Units are So 2007 — Matthew Booth

Booth gives an overview of responsive programming and its pitfalls. However, adaptive design may be the faster and more efficient solution. Although the presentation was a bit too basic for me, some good information, stats, and resources.

The landscape of today’s web would be unrecognizable back when “table-less” designs ushered in the age of CSS and a more “beautiful” internet. Currently, everyone is excited over responsive and adaptive web technologies.

A user’s expectations and experiences with our websites and apps are more important than ever, but our jobs are becoming increasingly complex. Join me for a developers insight into responsive websites and how they can improve a user’s experience and meet their expectations. Maybe our jobs will become a little easier along the way.

In true developer fashion, see the presentation on his website at socalux.imaverage.com.

The Payoffs and Pitfalls of Gamification — David Holifield @dholifield www.interfuel.com/

This talk was packed with information. Unfortunately, some of the content is coming out in an upcoming book, so I won’t be posting the audio. Some topics to research include:

Gartner Gamification Hype Cycle — Richard Bartle Types of Gamers (video) — Amy Jo Kim Social Engagement Verbs — Amy Jo Kim Player Journey — Engagement Loop — Nir Eyar: Hooked — SAPS

Sessions I didn’t attend:

Cross-Functional Collaboration — Panel Hosted by Scot Angus @jscotangus

[blockquote source=”SoCal UX Camp”]Everyone is tired of it taking so long to ship products that we later realize missed the mark in some way. Heavy, deliverable-focused, inflexible processes used by fragmented teams are part of the problem. Not doing any research is another. So a moderated panel of folks will talk about their experiences trying to solve those problems by working on collaborative cross-functional teams (or driving the adoption of collaborative approaches) within their organizations — the challenges and successes — and then answer questions from the audience.[/blockquote]

Awaiting a Video.

Dark Patterns — Skander Garroum @skaGarroum

]A Dark Pattern is a type of user interface that appears to have been carefully crafted to trick users into doing things, such as buying insurance with their purchase or signing up for recurring bills.

Normally when you think of “bad design”, you think of the creator as being sloppy or lazy but with no ill intent. This type of bad design is known as a “UI anti-pattern”. Dark Patterns are different — they are not mistakes, they are carefully crafted with a solid understanding of human psychology, and they do not have the user’s interests in mind. We as designers, founders, UX & UI professionals and creators need to make a stance against Dark Patterns.

See examples at http://darkpatterns.org

Defining Your User Experience — Natalie MacLees @nataliemac nataliemac.com

As professionals, we’re often focused on the user experiences we create for our clients, but have you taken the time to do for yourself what you do for others? Have you defined the user experience of working with you?

In this talk, I’ll cover how important it is to define your own user experience, how to put yourself in your clients’ shoes and think about all the little things that can make you stellar to work with.

Although beautiful, the slides don’t have enough content to be understandable without audio.

— - Design for Fingers, Thumbs & People — How People Really Hold and Touch Their Phones and Tablets — Steven Hoober @shoobe01 donttouchme.com/

We are finally starting to think about how touchscreen devices really work, and design proper sized targets, think about touch as different from mouse selection, and to create common gesture libraries.

But despite this we still forget the user. Fingers and thumbs take up space, and cover the screen. Corners of screens have different accuracy than the center. It’s time to re-evaluate what we think we know.

Steven will review the current state of research on how people actually interact with mobile devices, present some new alternative ideas on how we can design to avoid errors and take advantage of this knowledge, and review work you bring so we can all come up with ways to improve real world sites and apps today.

Slides (website includes notes)

Designing a Career in UX — Whitney Hess @whitneyhess whitneyhess.com

Designing the product is all for naught if you don’t first take the time to design the organization.” I tweeted this almost two years ago and it completely changed the trajectory of my career. In this session, I’ll explain how I went from designing interfaces to designing culture, from wireframes to coaching. We will discuss how user experience relates to other disciplines, how to bring your skills to other domains, and how to plan your career beyond the bounds of UX. All participants are welcome and I encourage you to bring your questions.

Hess didn’t use a slide deck, but much of her advice can be found on here website listed above.

Not Yo Mama’s Usability Test — Planning, Facilitating, and the ROI — Wendy Eichenbaum ucentricdesign.com

No slides found.

— - Rapid Prototyping for Mobile Apps — JC Jubilo @jc_jublio jcjublio.com

Do you have a mobile app idea but not sure where to go from there? Rapid prototyping is the fastest way to validate your idea whether you are a UX designer in an internal team or a startup entrepreneur with the next big thing in mind. I’ll walk you through the process of converting an idea into an interactive prototype in no time! It’s a fast, inexpensive, and effective way to communicate with everyone involved in a project, including designers, developers, and potential investors. Learn how to prototype so you can avoid any miscommunication that can lead to a lot of wasted time and money. It could also help you to get early feedback from customers so you don’t end up building something that no one wants to use.

I couldn’t find slides, but I did find these resources from her talk: — http://Pttrns.com — http://mobilepatterns.com — http://androidux.com — http://uiparade.com

Self-Organized, Autonomous UX — J.J. Kercher @jjkercher

In an agile environment, establishing usability and user experience as the responsibility of the UX team is destined for conflict and frustration. Learn how transferring this ownership onto the cross-functional team ultimately responsible for delivering the experience builds trust and empowerment and ultimately provides an environment that fosters collaboration, growth and innovation. This presentation will discuss the evolution of incorporating UX into agile at AppFolio, the roles and makeup of our development teams as they exist today, and some examples of how those teams collaborate around design solutions when tackling big feature enhancements on our mature product.

The Hard Way: UX Leadership Lessons — Roman Bercot romanbercot.com

User experience professionals are enjoying ever more visibility and responsibility within our organizations, creating great opportunities for advancement. Unfortunately, most companies are not investing in management and leadership training before promoting individual contributors into leadership roles.That’s why many of our bosses are so good at UX but fall short when it comes to effective leadership.In this talk I provide seven tips I learned the hard way. This talk is geared toward new UX leaders and those who wish to become more effective as managers.

Slides are here

Understanding Your Target User… The Visual Thinking Way! — Jeannel King @jeannelking jeannelking.com

Join Graphic Facilitator Jeannel King and learn how to draw forth insights about your target user. You’ll use three different visual templates to better understand who your target user REALLY is, what that user REALLY wants/needs/expects/feels, and how that understanding can inform your actions to better meet their needs moving forward. All through the lens of cool cats and cat wranglers.

Jeannel’s Slides were also not understandable out of context. View her blog or upcoming talk on her site (above).

— -UX for Responsive Design- Mario Noble @mndtwit marionobledesign.com

Responsive Design is one of the more popular approaches to optimize layouts for an ever growing plethora of devices and platforms. This presentation will cover how applying Responsive Design affects the UX process with regards to usability, wireframing, prototyping, visual design, business ROI, and information architecture. It will also discuss some of the pitfalls and opportunities one needs to consider before embracing this particular method.

No slides found.

When The Dinosaur Met The UX Meteor: Secrets To Creating a Forward Thinking Design Organization — Greg Zapar @GregZapar gregzapar.com

The common thread for UX practitioners is that we seek to create great experiences for our audiences… by solving problems and creating opportunities through design. Many organizations truly embrace a design culture while others are working through the challenges to implement a more user-centric approach to their products and services. While “UX” is finally coming of age, there are still many opportunities to create better outcomes for business and users and YOU will play an instrumental role in shaping the evolution of business design.

No slides found.

Workshop (3hrs): Designing for Ecosystems: The Intersection of Connected Technology & People — Steven Hoober @shoobe01 donttouchme.com/

We are finally starting to think about how touchscreen devices really work, and design proper sized targets, think about touch as different from mouse selection, and to create common gesture libraries.

But despite this we still forget the user. Fingers and thumbs take up space, and cover the screen. Corners of screens have different accuracy than the center. It’s time to re-evaluate what we think we know.

Steven will review the current state of research on how people actually interact with mobile devices, present some new alternative ideas on how we can design to avoid errors and take advantage of this knowledge, and review work you bring so we can all come up with ways to improve real world sites and apps today.

No slides found.


Originally published at veerkampvisuals.com.