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Nope, Apple’s not going anywhere.

Apple didn’t get the start of the year they wanted, and apparently, the last quarter of 2018 was pretty rough for them too. CEO Tim Cook kicked the year off by penning a letter to Apple’s investors that the demand for the iPhone wasn’t strong. This applies to all of their markets, from emerging to developed markets. He especially cited the year-over-year decline from China, which is one of their major markets for their premium smartphone.


Kodak, the camera behemoth of the 90s, is attempting to reinvent itself after nearly fading into obsolescence. It is now heading into a different direction, from providing hardware and technologies into the print industry, to some form of a retro brand that targets niche markets. In the article “From skate to streetwear: Kodak’s plans to bring back its consumer brand in a ‘big way’,” Kodak basically took an about-face from making cameras to selling vintage clothing. While this may be slightly profitable for now, this strategy won’t really elevate them back to “consumer brand” status. …


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Netflix is once again borrowing money to keep its content library updated. This time, the streaming giant is borrowing $2 billion from debt markets, in the form of senior unsecured notes.Netflix says the money will be used to fund new content, including new acquisitions, production and development, investments, and strategic transactions, among others. The cause is indeed noble, but the rate of borrowing/spending is alarming, and it could be their undoing. Netflix could be joining Blockbuster very soon if it none of its risky financial moves pay off.


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P.T. Barnum is often credited for the line, “There’s no such thing as bad press.” Whether he actually said those words are up for debate, but given his penchant for grabbing media attention wherever and however he could, it’s a reasonable assumption this quote was from him.

But, as we’ve dived deeper and deeper into the 21stcentury and culture has come to accept an ‘anything goes’ mentality toward life, social media, politics, and just about every type of decorum, is it okay for companies to take on the same idea to get the ‘word’ out about its product, brand, or service? …


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Take a look around. What do you see? Let’s focus on the biggest companies in the world for now (not your desk or chair or office mates). There’s Google, BMW, Lego Group, Canon, Walmart, Apple and Microsoft, and McDonald’s, just to name a few. These mega-corporations are so massive it’s hard to even imagine them filing for bankruptcy and no longer being around, right?

That’s been the case for generations.

In fact, in the US alone there are numerous examples of major companies that at one time seemed impenetrable, undefeatable, impervious to any outside forces or competition.

Oldsmobile was a famous car brand established in 1897, but in April 2004 the company closed its doors for good. Borders Books & Music was founded in 1971 and at its peak was a direct competitor to Barnes & Noble. After 40 years in business, the company petered out and its direct competitor acquired all its trademarks and customer lists. The Finnish tech company Nokia, which at one time manufactured the “must-have” mobile phone on the market with its patented two-way radio quick-talk feature, is about to be completely phased out after Microsoft acquired it. …


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It’s time to celebrate! Crack open the champagne, plan the party, invite your guests; no longer will we be ensnared by the 9-to-5 working schedule.

But how does that statement hold up when millions of people are still slugging it out in rush hour traffic, spending an hour or two (sometimes even more) each way into and from work five days a week?


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The size of the check was formidable. The smiles on the men and women holding it glowed. Brilliant white teeth, perfectly positioned hair, and lighting that had been carefully crafted to capture the moment for posterity were factors that took place behind the scenes.


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Starbucks recently made headlines by opening its first ever store in Italy. Italy, the country where espresso came from, is not really big on fancy, sweetened, or iced coffee. So, what pushed the coffee chain giant to the edge and open up a store in an obviously unwelcoming environment? It’s quite simple really — they’re not there to just sell coffee, they’re there to push the brand. They’re after the coverage that the controversial move will stir up, and it won’t matter if they sell enough cups or not.


It’s okay. You’re not alone. Nike’s controversial new ad campaign featuring Colin Kaepernick of former NFL fame who gained notoriety far beyond the gridiron for kneeling at the American national anthem was chosen as the spokesperson for this mega company’s 30thanniversary of their ‘Just Do It’ slogan.

The catchphrase that roared around the world like a raging inferno read:

Believe in something; even if it means sacrificing everything.

Let’s leave the politics of this issue outside, in the heat and humidity where it can sweat off a few pounds from its over-bloated ego for a while.

Let’s get back to the title of this article, shall we? …


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I’ve been passionate about doing business for as long as I can remember. This probably came from watching my mum successfully run several businesses, from a dress making shop to a cosmetics line. Watching her turn ideas into gold made me confident that success was in my DNA.

I believed I was going to become a millionaire at 21, or 25 at most. I was in a haste to get over my university education, which wasn’t optional for a girl child born to middle class African parents in the 80’s. Although I struggled through it, I earned my first degree at 21. I was excited; I could finally decide on what to do with my time and knew exactly what I wanted– make money and become totally independent.

semilimes

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