By Maud van Paassen & Remco Snijders

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Some months ago, we started a blog series about doing low code right. While the technology provides great benefits — offering plug-and-play components, making development easy and accelerating delivery — the very same benefits could easily turn into pitfalls. While speeding through development without a rigid way of working, some organizations end up with low-quality, poorly performing products that are hard to maintain.

In our last post, my colleague Riccardo explained how we prevent a spaghetti architecture and build a stable 4-layer lasagna instead. …


‘Mind the step’ sign
‘Mind the step’ sign

Low-Code is promising to radically change the way organizations develop and manage their IT landscape. So far, there are many signs that this app development approach is delivering on this promise. Companies of all sizes are rapidly developing new applications and setting up their own Low-Code ‘Centers of Excellence’. The development platform market is projected to grow from USD 13.2 billion in 2020 to USD 45.5 billion by 2025 [1].

While we’ve seen many organizations implement Low-Code successfully, we’ve also seen some organizations struggle. It is definitely possible to have your internal employees develop innovative applications in a matter of…


A wall with many post-it notes
A wall with many post-it notes
Photo by Nathália Rosa on Unsplash

Have you ever been in a meeting where everyone, including yourself, was eagerly taking notes but you failed to see any results of people’s effort? Perhaps worse, you haven’t even looked back at your own notes?During these days of remote meetings, people’s note-taking is even less visible. The other attendees of a meeting might or might not write down which ideas are shared, which questions are raised and which decisions are taken. It’s not that we do not want to share our screen, it’s because we prefer to share a screen that has been carefully prepared.

Now imagine a completely…


A camera lens that puts focus on the otherwise blurry road ahead
A camera lens that puts focus on the otherwise blurry road ahead

You‘ve got your goal, you’ve got some ideas; you’re ready to design.

Quite often, a Design Sprint is filled with excitement and creativity. Everyone is full of ideas and the prototype that rolls out of the process is exactly what we were looking to create.

When the team shows the prototype to their colleagues, their excitement is confirmed. That looks pretty cool indeed.

The roll out of the Minimum Viable Product is a success, it works as designed. The team celebrates, but the product doesn’t quite hit the right tone. The result seems complete, but the essence might be missing…


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High energy, a breathtaking prototype and insightful feedback. If that’s what you’ve got after a design sprint, it has been a successful one. Now you’re up for a challenge, how are you going to maintain this level of involvement and velocity?

In my last article, I already described how some additional ingredients can complement your design sprint to prepare you for the development and roll-out of a working product. One of the technologies that you can use to develop that product is Low Code.

I’ve spent the last five years developing with Mendix and Outsystems, two market-leading Low Code platforms…


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You’ve probably sprinted before. You wanted to catch the train, find shelter when the rain started or challenge one of your friends. While some people are faster than others, everybody can run a short distance as fast as they can.

A marathon is a different story. Opposed to running as fast as you can over a short distance, you need to manage your energy. This requires strategy and preparation. Long-distance trainings, special diets and breathing exercises can help build your stamina. …


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User eXperience (UX) and User Interface (UI) are rarely discussed as two separate topics. Job descriptions include both concepts, trainings promise to teach a combination of the two and companies sell ‘UI/UX design’. While this is convenient in everyday office language, it poses a risk to building truly great experiences.

I have recently finished the book ‘The best interface is no interface’. It’s a must read if you’re into UX design and it’s an even more important read if you think you’re into UI/UX design. …


So let’s start with a bit of an introduction.

After 10 years of learning about software delivery and actually delivering IT products, I’ve confirmed for myself that I really like to create things. Whether it’s a quirky side project or a core system for a large organization, creating applications always triggers a combination of analysis, creativity and a lot of learning. However, it’s not just the creation I have enjoyed. The process that guides the creation and sharing thoughts about different approaches within that process started to interest me along the way. …

Remco Snijders

Likes designing, building and talking about software. Does this at Quatronic.

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