BY MARK GRUENBERG

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Demonstrators bring an anti-racist message right to President Donald Trump’s front door. | LCLAA via Facebook

Originally published at People’s World.

WASHINGTON — Upset and energized by President Trump’s inadequate tele-prompted words on white supremacy, racism and the mass murders in El Paso and Dayton, hundreds of people gathered opposite the White House Aug. 6 to link Trump to the massacres — and to vow continued campaigning to get Congress to act, plus retribution at the polls next year for lawmakers and Trump if they don’t.

The snap demonstration, called by the New Poor People’s Campaign, the Teachers (AFT) and the Service Employees, also drew large contingents from the AFL-CIO and Labor’s Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA), organized labor’s constituency group for Latinx people. …


BY MARK GRUENBERG

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Photo shows destruction in Nagasaki after the US dropped an atomic bomb on the Japanese city. | Wikipedia (CC)

Originally published at People’s World.

It was early in the morning and 7-year-old second-grader Michiko Kodama was learning her lessons with her classmates when the life she knew — the world she knew — came suddenly to an end.

There was a blinding flash of light and an enormous explosion. The school roof fell in, literally. The windows shattered into hundreds of shards of glass. Many impaled her, leaving her dazed and bleeding. When she made it to the nurse’s station, there were no medicines, bandages or gauze to help heal her.

Kodama, you see, was a schoolgirl in Nagasaki, Japan, that day, August 9, 1945, when the U.S. dropped an atomic bomb on that Japanese city, her home. It exploded 600 meters above and several blocks away from the school, and changed her life forever. It was the U.S.’s second A-bomb of Japan, after the destruction of Hiroshima three days before. …


BY CHAUNCEY K. ROBINSON

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Michael Lionstar, Alfred A. Knopf / AP Photo

Originally published at People’s World.

“The function of freedom is to free someone else.” — Toni Morrison

The world lost an icon today. Prolific novelist, essayist, editor, and professor Toni Morrison passed away at the age of 88. Morrison’s family confirmed “with profound sadness” that Morrison had died “following a short illness.” The Nobel Prize winner leaves behind a legacy rooted in uplifting the voices and visibility of Black women and Black culture, along with never backing down when speaking against the ills of society that continue to cause oppression.

Morrison authored 11 novels. Some of her most well-known books include The Bluest Eye, Song of Solomon, Beloved, and Tar Baby. Although many know Morrison for her own writing, she had a long history of working to bring Black literature into the mainstream as an editor. …

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