Learn how Gatherly hosted a national albinism conference where many attendees were visually impaired.

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An image from a past NOAH CON event (Rick Guidotti)

Community matters.

Months into a global lockdown, many of our communities have been stripped away from us. We’ve had to say goodbye to fellow students, coworkers, and friends — all for an uncertain amount of time. As naturally social creatures, we crave human interaction, yet we currently find ourselves sorely deprived of it.

Over the past couple of months, many of us have found ourselves reflecting on the communities that matter to us. For some, this loss has been particularly poignant.


When it comes to natural engagement, regular video chat leaves much to be desired.

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Photo by Product School on Unsplash

The verdict is out — COVID-19 is normalizing virtual interaction. This isn’t a temporary disruption, but rather the beginning of a larger shift that is making our lives increasingly (if not predominantly) virtual.

While some events have been cancelled or postponed, many have been brought online, often with varying levels of success. In order to understand how events big and small are going virtual, our team has spoken to over 200 event organizers over the past few months.

Many organizers have had to make do with platforms like Zoom, and we’ve learned of some interesting hacks being used to make these events more interactive. While creative, these “solutions” leave much to be desired, and highlight some of the core issues of using traditional video chat platforms for hosting events. …


In a world of video calls, are we saying goodbye to meaningful engagement?

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Photo by Chris Montgomery on Unsplash

Years of all-nighters. Countless exams, priceless memories, lifelong friends. The college experience is for many a transformative one. A journey from youth to adulthood which culminates in earning a (hopefully useful) degree.

So how’d it go for the class of 2020? I asked a friend who recently graduated:

“Uh yeah so I spent the last 2 months of college stuck at home watching pre-recorded lectures. My fam and I then watched my name on a slideshow during the virtual commencement.”

The class of 2020 has been robbed of an experience of a lifetime. Instead of walking across a stage, pumping their fists in triumph, they watched a chapter of their lives come to a close behind a computer screen. Graduation parties became replaced by disengaging 30-person Zoom calls, and the communities that defined their college experience suddenly felt distant. …


A new wave of disruption has changed how we get around. Let’s break down the biggest trends so far, and take a look at what we can expect in 2020.

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2020 is just days away, and to a 1980s science fiction writer, things are probably looking pretty underwhelming. Why are we zooming around on electric scooters instead of on hoverboards? Why are we sitting in traffic, still dreaming of flying cars? Hell, why are we still even driving our cars?

Rest assured, the promises of revolutionary tech won’t go unmet. The past decade has seen rapid technological innovation when it comes to transportation — self-driving cars, for instance, have gone from research projects to commercially viable ventures. And that’s great! But as we find ourselves in an increasingly futuristic world, it’s important to look back and understand the shifts that have brought us to where we are today. …


Musk and company throw out the rulebook. We’re left to ask, what is a Tesla?

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Starman, pt. 2

A low-polygon count render of a pickup truck? Bruce Wayne’s vehicle of choice for transporting cargo around Gotham? A fusion of origami and space-grade stainless steel?

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<insert joke about how live demos never work>

The Tesla Cybertruck (yeah, that’s actually what they’re calling it) is not your typical pickup. This thing is an absolute beast. It starts at $39,900 — only about $5,000 more than Tesla’s budget-friendly Model 3. And that price doesn’t take into account the $7,500 federal tax credit or savings on fuel. With the tri-motor spec, Tesla claims that Cybertruck will tow about 5 billion pounds and go from 0–60 in 2.9 seconds. …


DARPA’s Grand Challenge sparked a revolution with a wild desert race. Nearly 15 years on, what comes next?

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Illustration by Rounak Bhunia.

Horseless carriages

During a recent trip to San Francisco, I caught a glimpse of a self-driving car. It wasn’t exactly difficult to spot thanks to a roof-mounted LiDAR suite and large orange lettering, but nevertheless my friends and I watched intently as it drove across the street. And then, just a few minutes later, I spotted another. And another. Our Lyft driver chuckled at my amazement.

Cruise’s self-driving car on the streets of SF.
Cruise’s self-driving car on the streets of SF.
Cruise’s self-driving car on the streets of SF.

“Those things are everywhere,” he said. “I actually cut in front of them, they usually let me through.”

Huh? They’re already here? …


The Silicon Valley giant made a hasty U-turn with iOS 6, and the journey that has followed shows us what makes Apple, well, Apple.

Animated Apple Maps logo, showing a wrong turn.
Animated Apple Maps logo, showing a wrong turn.
Illustration by Rounak Bhunia.

The most beautiful, powerful mapping service ever

The summer of 2012 is wrapping up. Obama’s up for re-election, and Gangnam Style is dominating the internet. You’re on your way to work, bogged down as usual in heavy Manhattan traffic. Suddenly, a scene of horror comes into view. The Brooklyn Bridge has collapsed — no, melted — into the East River. Entire roads have been warped, cars and their passengers flattened. Oh, the humanity!

The warped and broken 3D render of the Brooklyn Bridge on the original Apple Maps.
The warped and broken 3D render of the Brooklyn Bridge on the original Apple Maps.
That’s not what a bridge should look like… right?

Similarly unfathomable scenes of armageddon played out across the world. Parts of Switzerland turned black and white. Cars sunk into the asphalt in Las Vegas. …


Once a wild success, the Pinto has become a symbol of corporate greed trumping public safety. But have we gotten it all wrong?

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Illustration by Rounak Bhunia.

An American comeback story

1970. The Ford Pinto was an innovative car. Compact, sleek, a breath of fresh air amongst the gas-guzzling behemoths that had clogged Detroit’s assembly lines for decades. Finally, a homegrown alternative to the Corollas and Beetles that infested the nation’s suburbs. The Pinto bore a fighting spirit — it was a valiant American effort to compete in a subcompact market that had flourished thanks to rising fuel costs.

Period Ford Pinto ad showcasing its appealing qualities.
Period Ford Pinto ad showcasing its appealing qualities.
Pinto ads at the time highlighted the affordability and functionality of the new vehicle.

Just a few years prior, Ford President Lee Iacocca had issued a clear directive: the company was to develop a car that would cost around $2,000 and weigh about 2,000 pounds to better meet changing consumer preferences. From the drawing board to the showroom, the Pinto was shaping up to be quite the value proposition. Adjusted for inflation, around $13,000 would get you a reliable sedan that could seat five, fuel economy that wouldn’t break the bank, and notably, a rather accommodating trunk. …


Ever code an algorithm to play a video game?

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Welcome to Terminal.

Take pizza, cool t-shirts, and four hours of competitive hacking, and you’ve got the Georgia Tech Game Night. I attended the event as a competitor, and below is why I think Terminal is (literally) game-changing.

In the field of Computer Science, developing technical skills is essential. Through classes, personal projects, and internships, students like myself are constantly competing to build their resumes in order to attract top companies.

We often, however, overlook the other side of the coin. Just as we students are desperate to get hired, employers are constantly trying to locate top tech talent. …


Andrew Ng offers an empowering specialization in AI

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I was just eight when Iron Man came out, and watching it left me awestruck. What was there not to love? Superhero tech, daring action, and Robert Downey Jr.’s cocky genius kept my heart pumping and my eyes glued to the screen.

Ten years later, struck by a bout of nostalgia, I rewatched the movie. The theatre did not fail to excite, but what captivated me now were not the explosions. Rather, it was J.A.R.V.I.S.

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Yup, Tony Stark’s artificially intelligent personal assistant. I was amazed by the grace with which Stark communicated with this almost lifelike personality, and began to consider the mechanics behind such a natural language system. A friend recommended checking out deeplearning.ai, …

About

Sohan Choudhury

Co-Founder @ Gatherly

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