5. Why does your phone’s battery suck?

More like it is stagnant
Bro! My phone dies every 8 hours. Have to charge it twice a day. Why do we not have good battery backups like the good ol’ days? My 3310 lasted a whole week.
 — What were you doing with that phone though?

Batteries used in our phone are the second most primitive technology that is still in use (First being the analog 3.5 mm headphone jack). The Li-ion batteries have not changed since their inception, except for a few minor improvements in production line. The technology is still more or less the same.

But this is not really a blog about your battery or your phone. It is about you and a strange behaviour you exhibit every time you have to crib something new.
 “Things were so good back in the days.”
 — 
Were they?
See humans has an inherent tendency to over-glorify the past. It may be sports players, music, culture or battery life. Pundits will never appreciate somebody like Dale Steyn, till the day he retires and then maybe in 10 years he will get a mental memorial like Ambrose or Akram have in us.

And it is not just nostalgia and juvenoia here at play, some of it is mere ignorance to trivial facts. I mean your 3310 lasted a week because it basically did not do anything. The screen of your phone alone today does more calculations than the whole phone back then. The processes are much more optimised, the batteries are bigger, but the tasks are many-fold more intensive than ever before. Also you use your phone much more often, it is an extension of you now and after all that the battery life on most of the phones are pretty respectable.
Apollo was successfully landed with a computer just as strong as a Tl-82, while many modern computer-led space flights have led to horrifying crashes. This does not mean that newer computers are bad, but that they face much different problems.

The other factor leading to this behaviour might just be plain denial. And the joy associated with reliving only the good parts of the past while projecting a glorified image through a rosy lens.

Ah! The good ol’ days!

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