Did you know that diyas lit on the moonless Diwali night signifies the end of darkness of ignorance and the beginning of light that enlightens all? Well, if so, why put a load on our environment? Why not play an Eco — sensitive Diwali?

Its not about avoiding fireworks and crackers or cutting down on the smacking ‘gulab — jamuns’, it’s a festival that can still be enjoyed and made the most out of the festive season. The festival, if celebrated according to the traditionals, has very little to do with crackers and fireworks. We should therefore play a ‘Greener’ and ‘Better’ Diwali instead of degrading the Nature.
◾Lighten up ‘diyas’ instead of electric lamps. In this process you would be saving a large amount of electricity, around 80%. And believe me — ‘The flickering lights from the diyas gives a much appealing, beautiful and serene look’.
◾Instead of burning deafening, harmful crackers why not opt for a bon-fire. You can go with your friends or even with small children of nearby village or your locality to collect some dry leaves, twigs etc. and get rolling, dancing, singing around a bon-fire.
◾Avoid using artificial colors for Rangoli. You can make Rangoli out of colorful flowers. They look natural, fresh and gives an aura of tranquility.

With the growing recognition of the impacts of Diwali on the environment, several groups have started to reinterpret the rituals and traditions to become more sensitive to nature. For instance, the children of NCL school, Pune celebrate a different Diwali by sharing clothes with the lesser privileged.

‘Lets make Diwali more meaningful and beautiful festival by going Green’.

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