We’re five weeks into the new Biden Administration. What are we to expect for the next year? The next four years? History tells us that the majority enjoyed in Congress will go away in 2022 in either the House or the Senate or both, and if and when one of those chambers is led by Republicans, Biden’s prospects of accomplishing what he wants without much compromise will diminish greatly. Given the political polarization in the US, Biden has two years to get his agenda through as well as any fiscal policy associated with getting the economy back on its feet…


This week, we have stark numbers to review. Of the 1.4M deaths in the world attributed to Covid-19, over 260,000 of them have been Americans. There have been over 12,000,000 infections in the United States — and that threshold was crossed only six days after 11,000,000 infections were confirmed. We have over 20 million people receiving some form of government employment assistance — with no additional help on the horizon. We still have nearly 750,000 new unemployment claims a week. We can draw a rather straight line correlating that rising virus counts hurt the economy. …


You may have thought that my several weeks away from writing economic observations in our coronavirus economy in a pupa-esque existence during my busy season would allow me to emerge from my chrysalis with a refreshed perspective. A lighter look. An ability to look back since my last writings at the end of summer, see how much things have improved, and write some accolade-laden floral missive that the world is great, the pandemic is contained and behind us, and that widespread prosperity reigned anew.

You may also have thought Borat wouldn’t be able to pull the wool over people’s eyes…


After witnessing a dismal second quarter, the prevailing thought among those in the economics and finance realm is that the third quarter will be a rebound, and the fourth quarter will be a question mark. But here’s the thing: I don’t think the third quarter rebound will be good. I think the pros are looking only at a rising market and improving retail sales and downplaying the economy’s reality of job losses that may be permanent combined with the cessation of expanded unemployment insurance. The people who think the third quarter will be good are conflating market performance and the…


Everyone affected by the coronavirus or its effects on the economy is at a different stage of grief as we wade through a new modern experience of the human existence. People have not necessarily gone through all of the stages, or had an experience within each one, but our shared experience is that grief is an internal process brought on by external stimuli — a pandemic, in this case. What is clear though is that those external elements — the experiences and outcomes of this “coroneconomy” — are affecting us in disparate ways. …


Long after the government actions to bolster the economy have ceased, after children return to schools, after wearing a mask in public becomes a memory, the virus will remain. It’s what they do. They reside in the host, within cells, waiting for the conditions to be ripe for them to present themselves again.

While this is not a medical column, a brief review of some common viruses and their later-life effects is warranted. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is highly contagious and has over 100 different strains. …


It was the most mediocre of times, it was the worst time since the last worst time. It was a time where sun could be seen through gathered clouds, it was a time of unyielding gale and torrential downpour. It was a time of generational wealth accumulation able to be seen in a microcosm, it was a time of systemic marginalization exacerbated by societal inequities able to be seen in the same span of months. It was a time of luck, it was a time of great misfortune. …


Typically, my musings in these columns are an attempt at showing what I see happening in our American coronavirus economy. A look beyond what’s seen in social media feeds and websites. An examination of if-then. It’s an effort to try to shine a light on the layers of the economic onion typically shrouded by a colorful outer skin. Economic nuance of the American economy can lead to a jaundiced perspective, and you can understand quickly from peeling the layers of our Vidalia named Capitalism that though sweet by appearance, it can indeed make you cry.

This week, however, I hope…


We are starting to see amid the weekly onslaught of unemployment numbers, confirmed cases, hospitalizations, and deaths that there are parts of the economy that were far from the initial splash of the coronavirus that are now feeling its waves. Concentric circles have radiated outwards: the virus was the cannonball into the placid deep end of a pool as adult swim ended, and those in the knee-deep wading area are starting to get their waists wet.

Over in the deep end, where the cannonball hasn’t surfaced yet, we had 1.3M new unemployment claims for the week ending July 3rd. 32.5M…


“Now we have freedom and responsibility — it’s a very groovy time.” -Austin Powers

The numbers from last week: 4.8M jobs created in the month of June, an unemployment rate of 11.1% — though that’s still low while the BLS irons out its survey method, and may actually be a point higher. The industries affected by the increase? Mostly leisure and hospitality — the relatively easy jobs to get back based on those furloughed in the spring. Also, the survey was taken the week of June 12th, meaning that rate doesn’t include re-closings in the second half of June as…

Andrew Williams

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