Photo by Abby Hassler

Life is like a Navajo Rug

Like the tedious process of weaving a Navajo rug, sometimes it is hard to see the big picture in life before the process you are going through is completed. It seems like the strands of your life are randomly being woven together, and you can’t make any sense of the patterns emerging. Until one day, the patient hands of our Creator finish their work and you finally see the finished product. You realize that there was in fact a unique design for your life all along.

Have you ever questioned your purpose in life and wondered how on earth all of the random experiences, skills, and passions you have will fit together to fulfill it?

I spent the last three years searching for answers to this question, and during this process God began to reveal to me part of His design for my life. But it was an interesting journey …

I transferred to Lee University during the fall of 2012. Since I grew up around the Cleveland area, I felt at home right away. But even though I was familiar with the town, Lee’s campus was a whole new world to me. It took a semester before I really began to get involved at school, but once I pushed myself outside of my comfort zone God began to take the reins and direct me on my path.

Like a typical college student, I changed my major about five times. I began with early childhood education, and then I changed over time to journalism, a double major of journalism and English, digital media journalism, and then finally communication studies.

Confused yet? I was too …

But throughout this process, God continued to open doors for me as He led me on my journey.

During VBS, we set up a face painting booth for the kids. I painted a mustache for Javier, and he thought I should have one too. #mustachselfie

During the summer of 2014, the Lord made a way for me to travel to Guatemala with Campus Choir and volunteer at a local orphanage. While I was there, I helped lead a four-day vacation bible school program that taught the children of their worth in Christ, and how God is a constant father with chain-breaking power over their lives.

I will never forget the moment during VBS when I prayed with Gabriella, a young girl from the orphanage. As I held her in my arms, I watched in awe as the Holy Spirit began to work in her. I explained to her that it was not really my arms holding her, but the arms of God. I emphasized to her that He loves her so much, and has plans to give her hope and a bright future. As I spoke, I began to see transformation in her sweet, watering eyes.

After meeting children like Gabriella face to face and learning about their stories and hardships, I knew that I wanted to work to find a solution to the orphan crisis. It was during this trip a seed was planted in my heart that developed into the passion that I have for orphan care today!

In the end, all of my experiences came together with a clear purpose. I was inspired to join the rescue with Serving Orphans Worldwide and I became a part of their wonderful team, all thanks to God’s perfect planning and timing.

I never could have imagined how my passion for working with children, journalism, digital media, and travel could all come together in the end, but I am so glad that God knew all along. The beauty about God’s design is that He even takes the things in life that are seemingly useless and unlovely, and incorporates them into His design making it more beautiful than before!

“And we know that God causes all things to work together for good to those who love God, to those who are called according to His purpose.” — Romans 8:28 (NASB)

Whether your life still appears to be a tangled web of wool and yarn or is starting to look like a beautiful Navajo rug, be patient throughout your process. Watch as God weaves together the patterns of your own life, and His magnificent design for you will emerge.

Story by Brianna Bentley


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