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Tale as old as time, song as long as rhyme: no one likes filling out web forms on the internet.

So about two years ago, SPACE10 decided to reimagine this interface with the introduction of Conversational Form: a tool that turns web forms into conversations—making it easy for developers and designers to engage with people in a more compelling and intuitive way.

What initially started as a digital exploration has now come full circle: Conversational Form is still free and open-sourced—but now it’s updated with new features and ready to be unveiled as Conversational Form 1.0.

Check out Conversational Form 1.0 on Product Hunt here.

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Out with the Old

Whether we’re searching for content or logging in to our email account, we fill out web forms every day when we browse the Internet. These web forms have been the status quo for decades—but with a few simple lines of code, they can be transformed into something as natural as a conversation.

Conversational Form 1.0 is an open-source framework, making it easy for developers and designers to turn any web form into a conversation with a single line of code. …


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Street view—by EFFEKT Architects for SPACE10

We teamed up with EFFEKT Architects to create The Urban Village Project — a vision for how to design, build and share our future homes, cities and neighbourhoods.

A new way of living together

The Urban Village Project aims to allow for cheaper homes to enter the market, make it easier to live sustainably and affordably, and ensure more fulfilling ways of living together. We envision that to happen by prioritising liveability, sustainability and affordability.

Liveability

A liveable environment needs to suit our unique needs, adapt to the pulse of daily life and offer us the support systems and social life we seek. The Urban Village Project aims to do that by unlocking the multiple benefits of living in a tight-knit community, offering flexibility and cultivating a sense of belonging. …


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SPACE10 is pleased to launch Spaces on Wheels — our latest Playful Research project, made in collaboration with visual trend lab f°am Studio.

We’ve designed seven autonomous vehicles as a visual exploration of how fully autonomous vehicles could one day enable a more fulfilling, everyday life. Alongside the designs themselves, we’ve launched a SPACE10 app where you can experience booking a Space on Wheels in Augmented Reality. Download the app here.

We’ve also published a research report that provides a deep dive into all things most relevant to self-driving cars — including challenges, opportunities and examples of self-driving initiatives transforming urban environments today. Read it here.

Ultimately, Spaces on Wheels invites more people to envision the profound paradigm shift the development of self-driving cars could have on our everyday lives. …


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All 📸 by Kasper Kristoffersen

Introducing the taco of tomorrow — a delicious dish developed by SPACE10 and made with ingredients grown in our underground aquaponics system. From freshwater fish and pea-shoot mole, to chilis, herbs and veggies in the salsa verde and hot sauce, our novel take on the taco is designed not only to showcase the food of the future but to titillate the taste buds.

First we brought you Tomorrow’s Meatball — a visual rethinking of the popular meatball using alternative ingredients such as insects, algae and lab-grown meat. Then came our spin on our favourite fast-food dishes — such as the Dogless Hotdog, the Neatball and the Bug Burger.

Now, with the summer holidays looming, we’re delighted to introduce the latest dish we’ve developed to showcase the kind of food we could one day be eating.

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Say hello to the Holy Mole Fish Taco. It’s our take on everyone’s favourite Mexican snack — and it’s made with ingredients that can be grown in the aquaponics system located in the basement of our Copenhagen headquarters. …


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Illustration by Max Guther

Ahead of the final event in our lecture series exploring ‘Designing for Shared Living’, architect and writer Hannah Wood explores what an uptake in shared living could mean for our mental health and collective wellbeing.

“We have dinner together every other night, we watch each other’s kids and borrow each other’s cars. We participate in community events and political rallies and we support each other through difficult life circumstances,” says Grace Kim, referring to the Capitol Hill Urban Cohousing project, a nine-unit shared development in Seattle which the architect calls home. The project was designed to facilitate everyday interactions between residents: the shared rooftop garden sustains the common dining room, while exterior circulation offers views down to a shared central courtyard where residents hang out when the weather permits. For Kim, who founded the architecture firm Schemata Workshop, which is situated on the ground floor, this is “communitas” in action — the sense of togetherness and support from the everyday familiarity of fellow co-dwellers. “Living in cohousing, we’re intentional about our relationships and we’re motivated to resolve our differences,” Kim has written. …


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Illustration by Max Guther

Ahead of the fourth in our series of lectures exploring ‘Designing for Shared Living’, architect and writer Hannah Wood speaks to architecture and design practices that are using diverse strategies to create a city which is accessible for all.

“In the city of Beirut, co-living is just called ‘living’. That sharing has diverged into a sought-after lifestyle is symbolic of our culture,” says Stephanie Akkaoui Hughes, founder of AKKA architects, in reference to the capital of her native Lebanon. “The segregation of programs and functions within many Western cities is a hangover from a modernist interpretation of urban planning in which activities don’t mix,” she adds. “Urban planners need to prioritise people.” Along with AKKA, the Copenhagen-based “architectural laboratory” Studio Fountainhead will appear at SPACE10’s ‘Designing for Shared Living: Possible Cities’ event on 11 May. Both firms believe that for shared-living spaces to flourish, they should seek to foster a strong sense of community not just within their four walls but beyond them. …


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Illustration by Max Guther

Ahead of the third in our series of lectures exploring ‘Designing for Shared Living’, architect and writer Hannah Wood explores the hurdles often faced by co-living groups as they seek to build lifelong communities, and how they’re being overcome.

“I first became excited by shared living when speaking about it with my friends,” says strategist Lars Lundbye as he chops asparagus for a communal dinner. “Wouldn’t it be great if we could all live together? Initially, the plan was to buy a summer house. Then time went by and we began thinking, maybe we could retire together when we get old. But each time we tried to realise those dreams, we were challenged by the practicalities. …


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Illustration by Max Guther

Ahead of the second in our series of lectures exploring ‘Designing for Shared Living’, architect and writer Hannah Wood discusses the challenges and opportunities that co-living spaces present architects and designers.

“Coliving has begun to transform our notions of ownership and habitat,” says Christelle Gautreau, a French architect who, along with her colleague Stéphanie Morio, spent the past year seeking to answer the question: what is coliving in 2018? “As architects, we travelled a lot, we lived abroad, and we saw a new form of housing emerge to answer to new needs, like coworking, which has disrupted the world of office spaces in just a few years,” explains Christelle Gautreau.

The result of their joint investigation is the HOMY Coliving project — a snapshot of 30 shared-living spaces around the world, from London’s 550-bedroom behemoth ‘The Collective’ to ‘Magic City’, a 12-bedroom space for arts, technology and DIY projects in Bogota. With an aim to “explain and illustrate this new habitat for the future”, they explored and mapped the communities inhabiting the new-build coliving spaces. “We were surprised just how diverse the groups living there were,” Stéphanie Morio explains, “from lifestyle communities to young professionals and remote workers — you name it. Yet, the design of the co-shares in general does not reflect this diversity. …


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All 📸 by Niklas Vindelev

The demand for affordable housing is a pressing issue for many cities. According to the UN, by 2050, the world’s urban population will have increased by 2.5 billion. The cost of housing will probably rise, homes will likely get smaller, and informal settlements such as favelas and townships could grow bigger. Could open source architecture and digital fabrication help tackle the global housing crisis and make well-designed homes accessible and affordable for the many people?

We think so. Which is why we invited Danish architecture students Johanne Holm-Jensen and Mia Behrens to do a six-month-long residency project.

Their task was to explore how to design low-cost, adaptable and sustainable homes that could be applicable globally and designed to be manufactured locally using a digital fabrication tool.

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One machine + one material = one space

Johanne and Mia ended up designing and building the prototype of a micro-house using one material — abundant FSC-certified sustainable plywood — and a CNC milling machine. The material cost? Just €163 ($192) per square meter.

The intention was that anyone, anywhere can download the open source design, customise the house to suit different landscapes, terrains and cultures, “print” the necessary parts locally, and assemble the house relatively quickly and easily. …


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All 📸 by Kasper Kristoffersen

Our Copenhagen headquarters recently played host to a dining experience designed to unfold our exploration of food. What’s Cooking was held in collaboration with two local companies, catering start-up .506 and wine importer Rosforth & Rosforth. Guests enjoyed a three-course meal prepared by .506 — one that was entirely plant-based — as well as plenty of natural wine. We also invited several speakers to share their views on cuisine, food production and ways to improve the food system. The evening began with a short introduction from SPACE10 about the origins of our Local Food lab. We’ve edited all of the transcripts below for brevity and clarity.

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Guillaume Charny-Brunet

Strategic Director, SPACE10

I’ve seen SPACE10 as a concert hall, a conference centre and a workshop, but never as a dining room. So this is a first. Tonight we’re going to talk about food. We’re a future-living lab, and our mission is to explore better, more meaningful and more sustainable ways of living. And eating is a big part of life.

In his TED talk, Caleb Harper — director of the Open Agriculture initiative at the MIT Media Lab — holds up an apple and asks, “How long do you think it has been since this apple was picked from a tree? From the moment it’s picked to reaching a supermarket?” The answer is 11 months. He uses it to illustrate the idea that, over the past century, we’ve built an amazingly efficient food system, in a sense that we’re able to bring a lot of food into our cities, to millions of people, at quite an affordable price. A century ago, about 90 percent of the population was involved in agriculture. We’ve spent the last few decades reducing that figure. …

About

SPACE10

A research and design lab on a mission to create a better everyday life for people and the planet.

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