All that Glitter(s) is not Gold

A conversation with Christian Rocha about an app, Glitter, that he designed during a hacker-in-residence stint we both participated in. Glitter failed, and was defunded.


Sandro Pasquali <spasquali@gmail.com>

5/9/15

to Christian

Hi Christian,

I was wondering if there was a way for me to see Glitter. I was always interested in what you were working on (being interested in card-based interfaces myself). You may have pivoted to cubes, even tesseracts…regardless, love to see what you’re working on.

I now have a modern iPhone, so…

Christian Rocha <christian@betaworks.com>

5/9/15

to me

Just sent you a build via Fabric; check your inbox. This build is very much a work in progress but I’d LOVE to hear your thoughts on it.

And how the heck are ya? Swing by the office sometime man. We’d all love to see you :)

Sandro Pasquali <spasquali@gmail.com>

5/9/15

to Christian

Swiping constellations of actions feels very fresh and natural

For me (maybe because of this damn carpal) pulling glitter down to the card (quite low) felt kinda crampy in my thumb. Maybe lob up?

Once I pulled up the card to max top and let go, the Cancel button felt weird. I wanted to just push it back down again (up/down like it is before you trigger the cancel button). I think the scaling interaction feels so smooth and natural, so staccato interactions w/ clicks decays some of that sophistication.

Have you ever heard of Day of the Tentacle? A very early Lucas Arts game. Anyway (and this is a *very good thing*). I felt the way the cards moved (on the “pile”) when I dragged them was like a soft character moving by shrinking and expanding…walking by rubbery actions, hopping. Fun.

I think texting these things around is going to be a lot of fun for a lot of people.

I’ll write more when I do more.

Christian Rocha <christian@betaworks.com>

5/9/15

to me

Dude, this is great feedback.

For me (maybe because of this damn carpal) pulling glitter down to the card (quite low) felt kinda crampy in my thumb. Maybe lob up?

That’s fair. I’ve actually noticed a lot of people having trouble figuring out to do with the card altogether. Definitely worth investigating something better.

Once I pulled up the card to max top and let go, the Cancel button felt weird. I wanted to just push it back down again (up/down like it is before you trigger the cancel button). I think the scaling interaction feels so smooth and natural, so staccato interactions w/ clicks decays some of that sophistication.

Yep, completely agree. That one’s on the todo list.

Have you ever heard of Day of the Tentacle? A very early Lucas Arts game. Anyway (and this is a *very good thing*). I felt the way the cards moved (on the “pile”) when I dragged them was like a soft character moving by shrinking and expanding…walking by rubbery actions, hopping. Fun.

I have never played day of The Tentacle but I was a HUGE fan of Maniac Mansion. Anyway, for almost all of the animations we’re using Pop, the animation library Facebook developed for Paper. The animation curves are so much more organic than the default iOS counterparts. Almost too organic for some situations, but in this case it’s a good fit.

I think texting these things around is going to be a lot of fun for a lot of people.

Thanks! Some other things we’re working on:

- Generally allowing users to interact more with other people’s cards. A ‘like’ button is an obvious one. Also thinking about things like being able to send money to card owners if they’ve say, added a Venmo account. Another one on the table is being able to add something like a ‘Yo’ button to your cards where people can nudg you via push.

- Allowing users to move items on cards and generally change the way they look. An obvious one I think.

Anyway, I aprecciate the feedback always eager to hear more

Sandro Pasquali <spasquali@gmail.com>

9/22/15

to Christian

How goes the glitter war? I’ve been telling some people about it. They like!

Also…when will storing more cards be possible? I’m prepared to be very demanding about this :)

Christian Rocha <christian@betaworks.com>

9/22/15

to me

Dude good to hear from ya! And good to hear you like it!

Tell me a bit about what you’re using Glitter for. Have a lot of ideas around adding more/less cards and actually trying to hone in on some best use cases.

Christian Rocha <christian@betaworks.com>

9/22/15

to me

…and otherwise Glitter’s going well, man. Betaworks seeded and incorporated us, Maya left Betaworks to join Glitter full time and we hired an incredibly talented nineteen-year-old web developer. There are a few different paths we can take with Glitter and we’re trying to figure out the best one.

How are you doing, man? Very curious to hear what you’re up to.

Christian

P.S. Added you to TestFlight so you’ll have access to our betas.

Sandro Pasquali <spasquali@gmail.com>

9/22/15

to Christian

I think it is perfect for software team onboarding and groupservicing (thats not a real word). I think new employees would have a chance to identify themselves in an expressive but safe (given silliness latitude) way — something that is not really possible, or at least difficult, for many people joining a team.

Teams can be larger than 5. Therefore, our range bounds place negative pressure on glitter spout.

There are obvious symmetries with other types of groups. The very young kid angle (which I sense from your branding) would also be fun here…sleepovers, for example. Glitter parties than a little kid can plan with faces. I think that’s where your brand is at, generally, if I’m reading it right.