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Employee turnover is never fun. I feel the pressure professionally when we have to redistribute workloads, and I feel the loss personally when I stop seeing a colleague who I consider a friend each day. Like any change in life, it’s a little daunting but also full of potential. Hopefully it’s a sign that you’ve been taking the right steps leading this team member up to this moment. That maybe you’re hiring the right people. Maybe you’ve helped them get to a point where they feel confident to tackle a new challenge.

People move around a lot today, especially in the IT industry. Reports from last year’s PayScale survey show that tech companies experience the highest turnover of Fortune 500 companies. You could easily speculate on the reasons why. Of course, each person and each company is different. …


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When I started working in news media almost 15 years ago, our office had some sweet, beige Apple Quadra desktops and few of those colored Apple clamshell laptops with the tiny screens. The fastest computer in the building had a single 1Ghz processor at that time. Newspapers were notoriously cheap on hardware, and pretty much everything else. But the news, like the mail, never ended. It was a cycle of constant work for the reporters, photographers, and the people whose technology I served up on a daily basis. We upgraded some network hardware here, added a new server there, and made do with the rest. But the main things that needed to stay up and running were legacy software apps from a niche newspaper software provider who is probably long gone now. Well, that, and the Eudora mail server. The software let the reporters work on stories with each other across the network, and it allowed them to measure word counts and column inches so their stories fit the page flows that were setup in the editorial meetings. It wasn’t even real-time editing like Google Docs, but it was the best available solution at the time. …


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Our Manager of Talent, Kevin Johnson, explains our values.

Organizational Values. Pretty important, right? Well, only if they actually affect the way you do business. Enron had a set of organizational values. No, really. They did. Integrity, Communication, Respect, Excellence. They were even chiseled in marble in the main lobby of their corporate office. Unfortunately for Enron, these values were little more than words on the wall, and ultimately the business failed as they lost sight of what they believed.

When I joined Springthrough almost two years ago, I was deeply impressed with the way organizational values permeated throughout the organization. Leadership had identified seven core values (Integrity, Respect, Passion, Responsibility, Accountability, Action and Learning) and I consistently heard these addressed as decisions (both big and small) were made in the office day-to-day. …


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Angular is a JavaScript framework that solves a problem that most people, even developers, didn’t realize they had on their websites. Workload distribution.

To explain workload distribution, let me provide you with an example scenario…

Imagine you’re on a shopping website, and you’re looking at buying an Emoji Smiley Face ChiaPet. Even though you like the Smiley Face, you think you decide to check out the Winky Face option.

When you click the link for that option, your browser tells the shopping website’s server what page you want. The server figures out what HTML that page will need, what data it needs to fill that HTML with, and which CSS files and JavaScript files it needs to display the HTML correctly. …


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We had a problem. My children had finally reached the age where a mobile phone is essential to their lives…at least, that’s how they described it to me countless times. They said that a mobile phone is more than a status symbol; it is the main way they interact with friends and classmates. Without a mobile phone, they are outsiders and lack any real social life. How did we get to this future? Regardless, my wife and I relented to the pressure. So now each have their own iPhone and can live happy, successful lives, right?

With a mobile phone, they have the freedom to access the Internet any time and anywhere. Gone are the simple days with one main family computer where I can walk by and see what they are up to or the occasional fights over who can use it and how long they can be on it. Now we are in all new territory. Unfamiliar ground where parents are discovering they really don’t know what their teens are doing, with whom they are talking to, and what they are seeing. It’s like their kid is traveling down some dark Diagon Alley with all manner of scary creatures. How do we turn this around and give parents a fighting chance to help their kids deal with technology successfully? …


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I’m going to avoid the explanation and assume that you’ve heard of Pokémon Go. Since its release a couple weeks ago the mobile gaming app has been one of the main news features of the month. Writers discuss what it says about our culture, why it gained popularity so quickly, what other businesses can learn from it, and more.

For me it was exactly the type of game I was waiting for. Not only does it bring back nostalgic memories of the original card game, but the game is unique with a strong community around it.

Rather than repeat the other articles out there, I wanted to share how my curiosity led me to build a Pokémon tool to work with the Springthrough Slack messaging system. …


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If you’re a die-hard follower of one or more political candidates, you may have already opted in to an email marketing campaign within the past few months. Or, more likely, you accidentally opted in by leaving that pesky little box checked when filling out an online form or making a campaign donation. Either way, you’re now at the mercy of the political email marketing machine, and if you’re not careful, it can quickly take over your inbox!

Why the candidates are going all-in on email?

Historically, political candidates spend a ton of money on marketing — tv ads, direct mail, events, and of course, photo opportunities. Email has, in recent years, become a very important marketing tool, because it offers direct access to a candidate’s target community, at a relatively low cost, and a very high rate of return. While a postcard or brochure costs money to print and ship (Ben Carson spent $7.3 million on printing and postage prior to February, 2016), the cost of email is limited to the subscription fee for an email platform and the investment of time for writers and designers of the messaging. …


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When it comes to making decisions, data matters. It helps reduce bias. It shows trends and can often predict future performance. There is plenty of data out there, which can be why some people avoid addressing it. In order to make sense of the numbers, your business needs to understand how the data reflects your business goals.

At Springthrough, we obtain meaningful data through tracking key metrics that define our organizational performance. Many will define these metrics as their Key Performance Indicators (KPIs).

Each metric connects to Springthrough’s strategic plan. With some financial metrics, that part is easy. The utilization of our employees, for example, connects directly to the profitability of our company as a services-based firm. We can also evaluate profit/(loss) by employee to see how our staff time coverts into profit. With other important metrics, they paint a picture of Springthrough’s reputation with its clients and employees. Both kinds of metrics define the performance of our company and what we can anticipate in the future. At a firm like ours, where people are the “product”, the numbers can reveal a lot about the health of our company. …


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We talk a lot about our process — Insight, Clarity, and Enablement — and how that translates into activities and deliverables. But as this process becomes more and more ingrained within our culture, it’s obvious that it is bigger than simply a checklist of activities.

Insight, Clarity, and Enablement represents an approach to client engagements that allows our teams (and yours) to move from the highly complex and ambiguous starting point, and into a state of clarity, direction, and ultimately disciplined action.

This thorough and exhaustive process of gaining understanding and insight prior to executing (or even planning) development projects or digital strategies serves to reduce risk — risk of making the wrong decision, risk of going outside project scope, risk of going over budget, or more simply: risk of waste. …


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This spring, I read an article by Lonnie Pacelli, in which the business and project management guru compared a doctor’s “bedside manner” to that of a project manager. It struck a cord with me.

We know the importance of soft skills. At Springthrough, we take them into consideration regardless of the field — from development to finance. But Pacelli advocates that it is especially important for a project manager to show empathy to clients. As a project manager, I see that value every day.

We manage various expectations, build a website project plan, help to coordinate and otherwise determine schedules, and often serve as the key point of contact for both the client as well as internal team members. …

About

Springthrough

A full-service technology solutions firm—from hardware to software implementation, to mobile app development and IT solutions. https://www.springthrough.com/

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