As a systems developer, one of my research interests is the development of systems for investing in and trading the financial markets. Leveraging both my engineering background and practical trading experience, I’ve developed a balanced and holistic methodology which also encompasses human factors and psychology. The following articles describe this methodology:

Matt Zimberg of Optimus Futures read these articles, and reached out to me for a live interview. Matt is a futures industry veteran and an encyclopedia of…


My professional background is in systems development and software engineering. Over the years, I’ve gained experience writing computer simulation models, developing large-scale systems, and analyzing large data sets.

When I first started trading several years ago, this engineering background gave me transferable skills to backtest and validate trading strategies. For example, it was a shallow learning curve to program and backtest strategies using tools like NinjaTrader and Amibroker.

However, it has also taken years to learn about and find a balance with important higher-level concerns, such as market dynamics, supply and demand, and trading psychology. …


When I first started trading, impatience was a major problem. Fearing I’d miss out on a major price move, I’d hurriedly enter into positions which didn’t fully satisfy my trading plan’s entry criteria. Or, I’d enter a position late, and skew the risk:reward ratio against me. When volatility increased and a stock’s price fluctuated, I’d become jittery and sometimes exit a position early. I’d spend too much time watching the intra-day price fluctuations, even though this had no relation to my longer-term trading strategy. Fortunately, I was at least using a system and didn’t lose too much money.

Over several…


My first serious foray into stock trading came in 2013. I had just read William O’Neal’s excellent book, “How to Make Money in Stocks: A Winning System in Good Times and Bad”. This book details a complete trading system called “ CANSLIM “ for trading stocks showing strong fundamentals and technical performance. Excited by what I learned, I committed myself to learning more about this system, and initially used it as the primary system in my trading account.

The CANSLIM system takes into consideration a number of factors, such as earnings performance and relative strength. One component of the CANSLIM…


For Resultra, I recently migrated the project from Go’s dep dependency management to Go modules. The primary motivations for transitioning to modules were to allow the project to be built outside the $GOPATH and work with GitHub’s fork and pull request model.

The project is currently using Go version 1.12. In version 1.12, module support is only triggered when a repository is not below the $GOPATH directory. To override this, the project’s Makefiles currently set the GO111MODULE environment variable to on. This transition went very smoothly in my local development environment.

Fixing Travis CI Builds to Work with Modules

When changes to incorporate Go modules were first pushed…


There is a frequent and definitive pattern in price movement, whereby price will steadily drift lower, then accelerate before bottoming out. Similarly, price will often steadily rise, then accelerate into a climax top.

No matter what trading strategy is being used, or what type of market is being traded, it is useful to distinguish between slow and steady versus more extreme, accelerated price movements. These accelerated price movements coincide with exceptional market conditions, when a trader should be watchful and prepared. …


Fundamentally, trading is about analyzing the supply and demand of a security (asset which can be traded), such as stocks, commodities, or Forex pairs. A trader then makes decisions to purchase or sell these securities, ideally for a profit. When entering a trade, there are numerous factors to take into consideration, such key price levels, liquidity, and momentum.

Momentum is the speed of movement for a security’s price. With respect to supply and demand, a security with strong momentum is experiencing an imbalance of demand over supply when price is rising, or supply over demand when price is falling. …


I’m a private, retail trader, meaning I trade my own money for myself. Most of my money is in conservative, long-term investments, but I also have a smaller account for trading individual stocks.

Trading Stocks in Strong Uptrends

In my trading account, the primary strategy is long-only positions in US stocks which are experiencing strong uptrends. I’ll typically hold these positions for several weeks to a couple months, depending on whether I’m stopped out or hit my price target.

To be in a strong uptrend, the stocks typically have experienced at least a 25% gain in the last quarter. These stocks are clearly experiencing a…


Every trader (or investor) is familiar with long positions. Expecting the price to rise, a trader simply purchases the shares, then later sells these shares for a profit or loss. This is as simple as can be.

However, stock prices can just as easily go down as they go up. In the case of falling prices, a trader cannot profit from long positions. Through a process called short selling, a trader can profit when a stock’s price goes down. Unlike long positions, there are some inherent risks to short positions. …


Leading into the market crash and bear market of 2008 and 2009, I was just beginning to learn about investing, trading and the financial markets. During this time, I took an interest in the work of Mebane Faber, who wrote a research paper about a very simple timing model to significantly improve the risk adjusted returns of long term investments.

Using this timing model, I took the S&P 500 index fund in my retirement account to cash when it hit the 10 month moving average. This single action prevented significant losses. Ever since, a variation of this timing model has…

Steve Roehling

Interested in systems, software, investing, trading, writing, drumming, and photography. https://sroehling.com

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