Kidney Failure, Dialysis, The NHS and Me

As a 30-year-old woman, visually impaired and living in London, with a recent diagnosis of end-stage kidney failure –, it leaves me with far too many tales to tell — to simply keep them all to myself! Some scary — some hysterical, so here goes nothing…! I have never been much of a writer. Putting my thoughts to paper, or in this case, a laptop keyboard — does not come naturally to me. So to do so for the first time when writing about what is *hopefully* the most difficult time of my life, poses a number of interesting challenges. I write this ‘blog’ I think they call it — for two reasons. Firstly, because I spend way too much time thinking about my kidneys (a sentence I NEVER thought I’d say!) and need a braindump! Secondly, I am hoping that my experiences can let others know that someone else is going through this as well — something I find difficult to remember at times. I will take any willing reader with me on my rollercoaster kidney failure journey, over a series of these entries. Detailing everything from Dialysis and disability debacles; to transplant terrors and beyond! To take ‘you’, the reader with me on this journey may make it feel half as long and far less daunting! I hope to provide an entertaining and informative look at all aspects of the life of a kidney disease patient. As awful as having kidney failure may sound — and it often is — I would like to think I can find the positive in any situation and I hope some of that positivity and humour shine through the darker moments.

That Fateful Sunday

March 13th was a better than average Sunday. The sun was out and the weather warm for the first time in a long time — finally, spring was in the air! I had needed my hair cut for some time and my local hairdresser had agreed to open up for me. A bit of a local Samaritan, she often regaled me with tails of her lending friends or neighbours a helping hand. She talked of many people with a vast range of disabilities — and I can so strongly recall, sitting there, listening to her versus the sound of the scissors — and thinking to myself how grateful I felt not to have any of these health issues she was
recounting — and how lucky I felt to be in such a good medical condition. A persistent cough, coupled with difficulty breathing had plagued me for a few days, but I wasn’t too worried about that — because after all, there’s always something going round! After a few hours shopping and tea with friends — it was getting late and time to head home… a very lovely day was had overall. I noted that even as the hours passed, my difficulty in breathing was becoming worse *it being necessary for me to sit down with exhaustion and shortness of breath every twenty seconds*. After learning that there wasn’t a slot with my GP for three weeks, I decided to phone 111 for advice. Upon hearing that the problem was in my chest, they insisted that they should send round a paramedic to my home, to check me over. I reluctantly agreed and hung up the phone. I felt extremely embarrassed that the neighbours were going to see an ambulance outside of my home and that such a fuss was being made over — what I considered to be — a chest infection. The 111 service was incredible and I had a paramedic in my livingroom in less than five minutes… no mean feat in London traffic… even on a Sunday night. He was jovial and none-too-concerned re my symptoms — until he took my blood pressure. Establishing that it was very high for someone of my age *181 over 130* he decided to take me to A&E — as a precautionary measure. The next bit, though necessary, is difficult to write. Remembering how a nice, sunny Sunday turned into a Sunday from my nightmares. Having previously being so terrified of anything medicine-related, I was extremely anxious to be in a hospital and not entirely co-operative. Having a terrible phobia of needles, I point-blank refused to let them take blood from my arm. After much persuasion I relented — and thank the stars I did, because those blood results would tell a thousand tales which would change my life forever. An on the spot blood check told the medical staff that I was extremely anaemic and had a Haemoglobin of 59 *the average being around 115*. A cannula was inserted and the blood was sent to the lab to be analysed immediately. At this point I was told that I would probably need a blood transfusion straight away. “Blood transfusion?” that seemed like a very serious and terrifying prospect and something I had only ever heard of from medical dramas — it couldn’t be happening to me… not in ‘real’ life! I was sent for a chest x-ray, whilst waiting on the blood results to come back. I was standing in the queue for the x-ray, when a Doctor ran up to me with a paper in his hand. He told me that they needed to move me quickly to a place where they could “keep me safe”. I was then hurried to the resuss department — among car crash victims — the smell of blood was heavy in the air — and this is when I began to get really scared. I was told that the results of the blood test showed a creatinine level of over 2000 *the norm lying between 70 and 100* I had no idea what this meant — only that it was something to do with the kidneys. A subsequent ultrasound would reveal my kidneys to be almost non-existent — shrunken and damaged. Even at this point, it did not occur to me that perhaps I had kidney failure. After all, that kind of thing happens to someone else — and for sure I would have known if my kidneys were in such a bad state! What happened next is probably the strangest thing I have yet ever experienced. In order to monitor my fluid output, they told me it would be necessary to fit me with a catheter *cringe!* It must have been apparent that I was in a bit of distress by this point, because the very helpful nurse decided that she was going to demonstrate those multitasking skills that women are so well-known for, attempting to insert a catheter in my body, whilst at the same time — attempting to make me laugh *to be fair, that was never going to happen no matter what she did!* She began working away in my most intimate of intimate places and said “do not worry… I am just a hobbit from Lord of the Rings, going on a quest!” Well, it certainly beats “do you come here often?” I suppose! Some hours later, around 3a.m Monday, I was on the renal ward, listening to the sound of many voices and the sound of even more beeping alarms when a Scottish Doctor complete with a full complement of medical staff, stepped through my curtain. “Stacy, I am Doctor… I have had a look at all your tests. You have end-stage kidney failure. Your kidneys are functioning at 2% and there is nothing we can do.” I will never be able to fully describe what I felt at that moment. Only that it must be comparable to being punched in the stomach, then falling off a cliff as a result. I would have given anything for that Doctor to have taken me and my partner to the side, out of earshot of the whole ward — and to have broken the news to me in a very different way. Before he clarified the way forward, there was a stretch of time *probably seconds, but felt like a lifetime* when I genuinely thought he was telling me that there was nothing they could do to save my life. He began detailing my Dialysis options, Peritoneal (stomach) versus Haemodialysis (chest) — but I could not take anything in at this point. I was told that a Dialysis nurse would see me after I had time for the news to sink in *I’m not sure it has yet!*. They disappeared back behind the curtain and my partner and I were left in stunned silence, with the sounds of the hospital all around us…