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FINALLY deployed to Heroku!!!

The Experiment’s Table of Contents
Part 1: An Experiment in the Making
Part 2: Getting Started with DigitalOcean
Part 3: Handling Redirects with DigitalOcean
Part 4: The Experiment Continues
Part 5: Deploying to Heroku

I’ve gotten a few requests to hurry up with this experiment. It’s been a while…I know. But finally…I’ve done it: I’ve deployed my personal portfolio to Heroku successfully!

If you don’t already know, Heroku is an ephemeral PaaS. Again, I’m a front-end guy so that statement is foreign language to me. Ultimately, it means that while it allows you to deploy a website onto the platform, it does not give you full hosting like say DigitalOcean or MediaTemple. You have to figure out database and image management yourself. They do have a ton of add-ons (which we will get into later) that can aid in this process. However, if you are not careful the cost for these addons can pile up quickly. Heroku offers a free tier so that you can test. You get 1,000 dyno hours per month. …


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Don’t call it a comeback…

The Experiment’s Table of Contents
Part 1: An Experiment in the Making
Part 2: Getting Started with DigitalOcean
Part 3: Handling Redirects with DigitalOcean
Part 4: The Experiment Continues

Hello, my fellow developers, DevOps folks and curious tinkerers. It’s been quite some time since I started this project. One year, one month and three days ago to be exact. I know I’ve been absent from updates on this project but I have not forgotten about it.

When we left off, I had just moved from MediaTemple to Digital Ocean, used their amazing documentation to get a droplet set up, MAMP stack installed, Perch installed, Let’s Encrypt scheduled to automatically renew and site up and running. If you have visited http://www.standingdreams.com


The Experiment’s Table of Contents
Part 1: An Experiment in the Making
Part 2: Getting Started with DigitalOcean
Part 3: Handling Redirects with DigitalOcean
Part 4: The Experiment Continues

I asked for total control and I got total control. One of the first issues I came across was that my site was no longer reading my .htaccess file. I had all these lovely redirects for previous blogs, non-www traffic, etc. Welp…all gone. I was so used to MediaTemple handling that for me. …


The Experiment’s Table of Contents
Part 1: An Experiment in the Making
Part 2: Getting Started with DigitalOcean
Part 3: Handling Redirects with DigitalOcean
Part 4: The Experiment Continues

The reason I’m getting started with this project is because I ran across this Chrome extension that does a variety of audits on your websites including SEO, security and performance. I got a 35% in the security department. While trying to figure out ways to increase that score, I realized how little I was able to do that with my MediaTemple GridContainer. I contacted MediaTemple to ask how I could alter the httpd.conf file and they told me I didn’t have access to the root because I was on shared hosting. …


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Battle of the Hosting Titans or A Project That Will Drive Me Crazy…?

The Experiment’s Table of Contents
Part 1: An Experiment in the Making
Part 2: Getting Started with DigitalOcean
Part 3: Handling Redirects with DigitalOcean
Part 4: The Experiment Continues

I have been a loyal customer of MediaTemple for years. They made my hosting needs extremely easy. I loved the customer service. I hosted sites for friends and family with ease. I just loved it.

However, as I got further into my development career and wanted more, I felt my tier was very lacking. I was paying $20 a month for a GridContainer. While it served my basic needs, it left me with no access to the root where all the fun happens. Being a true tinker, this was unacceptable. At the company I worked at, we use Heroku and DigitalOcean on a few sites. …


Someone once told me you’re supposed to read 2–4 books a year. I’ve heard of people reading 1–2 books a month. The notion of massive knowledge consumption is scary to me. I begin thinking about what are you doing with all that consumption? All of that information, where is it going? How are you utilizing it? It’s as if you are welcoming overload into your life.

Throughout the year, I fluctuate between a consumption phase and an output phase. I reach points where I feel I don’t know enough. Whether it’s a certain topic or about life, in general. I begin to seek answers to these burning questions. I Google everything. I Wikipedia everything. I look for new blogs to read and magazines to take in the images. I sit with people of different disciplines and backgrounds. I pick their brains and ask what makes them tick and how they found their success. I break things apart to see what’s on the inside. Then I put it back together to learn the building process. …


Recently, I did a fresh install of El Capitan on a few of my systems. A co-worker has been telling me how much he loves Apple’s Safari over Google Chrome. Although I prefer Chrome as my browser for development, I decided to give Safari a try for every day use. I will admit that it’s been a great experience overall. My only issue are a few of the shortcuts. Specifically the CTRL+Tab and CMD+Shift+arrow keys to change window tabs.

To me, those shortcuts suck. If you’re focused on the address bar and use CMD+Shift+Right Arrow, it doesn’t change tabs. Then, depending on what you’re focused on, CTRL+Tab doesn’t always change tabs. It just toggles between the other items that you’re focused on. …


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I love Sublime Text. And although I HATE Terminal sometimes, it’s a tool that I cannot escape. Git is necessary and since I have not gotten into GUI Git clients like Tower or SourceTree (Read: I’m too lazy to learn them), I am stuck using Terminal for my Git commands. Since Git is where it all starts, opening a directory in Sublime Text is a function that is greatly appreciated. Luckily, Sublime Text comes with a subl command-line interface.

I recently did a fresh install of El Capitan on my MacBook Pro and had to hunt down how to make this feature available from terminal. However, since I use ZSH, my usual suspect didn’t work. …


Internet security is the thing these days. February 9 (yesterday from this writing) was Safer Internet Day. In an effort to make sure my internet properties are safe, I have turned to Dashlane. A VERY cool product that I recommend to many people. It allows you to create super safe passwords and keeps them safe in one location. When I want to login to a site, Dashlane offers icons next to form fields and auto populates my email address and password to that site. It even does auto-populating for newsletters and much more.

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Those handy little icons are absolutely positioned span tags that get served on to the page via JavaScript. The problem comes when you have forms inside of hidden divs. Yes, the form is gone, but for some reason the icons are still there.


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I’ve been working with Perch CMS since I started at The Morrison Agency. It’s an amazing CMS that lets you give the end-user better control over his/her content. Sometimes I wish it was more popular than it currently is so that there would be a swarm of support forums, posts, and more about minor items. They have their own forum and even a Slack group (shout out all my PerchChat members!) but sometimes you want to be able to Google an issue and find a quick fix.

In an effort to help create that “Google-able” help, I want to begin posting some of the issues and items that I come across here on my Medium blog.

Stay tuned.

About

Douglas “Wise” Rogers

It's just different.

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