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Image © Steve Austin used with permission

By Steve Austin, JD | ASLA | Clinical Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture, Washington State University

The ravages of the pandemic and needed responses to the climate crisis are forcing new thinking about the goals of city planning. Most recently, the idea of a “15 minute” city is emerging. A 15-minute city is a one in which citizens can access all of their most basic, day-to-day needs within a 15-minute walk of their homes. This wonderful vision of humane human habitats is surely where all of our cities need to get to. …


Image for post
Image for post
Image © Steve Austin

By Steve Austin, JD | ASLA | Clinical Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture, Washington State University

The ravages of the pandemic and needed responses to the climate crisis are forcing new thinking about the goals of city planning. Most recently, the idea of a “15 minute” city is emerging. A 15-minute city is a one in which citizens can access all of their most basic, day-to-day needs within a 15-minute walk of their homes. This wonderful vision of humane human habitats is surely where all of our cities need to get to. …


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© Steve Austin (used with permission)

By Steve Austin, JD | ASLA | Clinical Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture, Washington State University

As the climate crisis accelerates, many well-meaning people are energetically promoting grand visions under Green New Deal banners to prepare the US for a post carbon future. The visions are extremely appealing, covering seemingly vital needs such as clean energy, transportation, affordable housing, ecological restoration, with justice as a goal and creating in good jobs in the process. …


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© Steve Austin (used with permission)

By Steve Austin, JD | ASLA | Clinical Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture, Washington State University

The enormous carbon emissions associated with concrete are now forcing us to reckon with our urban future. For 100 years we have used concrete to reshape the planet to suit the immediate needs of rapid urbanization.Its use is so prevalent that it is, after water, the second most used substance on earth. Concrete is so ubiquitous that it also seems that our imaginations have been encased in it as well, for few can imagine life without it. …


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© Steve Austin (used with permission)

By Steve Austin, JD | ASLA | Clinical Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture, Washington State University

For over 30 years in various capacities, I have taught the profession and craft of landscape architecture to university students. Sharing my love and passion for landscape architecture with students has been one of the great joys of my life. The academic, professional, and community recognition they have received for their individual and team work gives me great personal satisfaction. Yet with all this, I now wonder if I am adequately preparing my students for their future.

Our…


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© Steve Austin (used with permission)

By Steve Austin, JD | ASLA Clinical Asst. Professor, Washington State University

Is it possible to fully acknowledge the climate crisis and its human causation and still be reluctant to embrace what science says is the solution? Many climate leaders exhibit the symptoms of this condition, described by climate scientist Kevin Anderson as “ mitigation denial.” Mitigation denial is evident in those who otherwise would never deny the reality of the crisis, but yet are not ready to accept the blindingly obvious answer: completely eliminating fossil fuels. This is possible because “ we fear the solutions more than the impacts,”…


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Image © Steve Austin. Used with permission.

By Steve Austin, JD | ASLA | Clinical Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture, Washington State University

Overview

As we enter into a new decade, humanity, and thus by extension, landscape architecture, is at a critical point. We face unprecedented enormous and wicked ecological predicaments including rapid loss of biodiversity, increasing pollution, diminishing resources, mass extinctions and most immediately, the climate crisis. To address, and hopefully end, the dreadful impacts of our destructive patterns, people around the world have begun formulating plans under “Green New Deal” banners. …


Image for post
Image for post

Image © Steve Austin. Used with permission.

By Steve Austin, JD | ASLA | Clinical Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture, Washington State University

Overview

As we enter into a new decade, humanity, and thus by extension, landscape architecture, is at a critical point. We face unprecedented enormous and wicked ecological predicaments including rapid loss of biodiversity, increasing pollution, diminishing resources, mass extinctions and most immediately, the climate crisis. To address, and hopefully end, the dreadful impacts of our destructive patterns, people around the world have begun formulating plans under “Green New Deal” banners. …


Image for post
Image for post

By Steve Austin, JD | ASLA | Clinical Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture, Washington State University

Overview

As we enter into a new decade, humanity, and thus by extension, landscape architecture, is at a critical point. We face unprecedented enormous and wicked ecological predicaments including rapid loss of biodiversity, increasing pollution, diminishing resources, mass extinctions and most immediately, the climate crisis. To address, and hopefully end, the dreadful impacts of our destructive patterns, people around the world have begun formulating plans under “Green New Deal” banners. …


Image for post
Image for post
Image © Steve Austin Used with permission

By Steve Austin, JD | ASLA | Clinical Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture, Washington State University

Right now, landscape architects face the most critical challenge in the history of the profession: how to fully and finally respond to the reality of the climate crisis. Climate science shows the crisis intensifying and accelerating, while making it clear how to avert the worst of it. To do so, humanity, including landscape architects, must halve fossil fuel use within 10 years, and zero them out within thirty years. …

steve austin

teaches landscape architecture, urban planning, and construction law at Washington State Univrersity. explorer of the post carbon world.

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