“Most people spend more time and energy going around problems than in trying to solve them.”

Henry Ford

Good morning peeps, meditation done.

“Most people spend more time and energy going around problems than in trying to solve them.”

Henry Ford

Henry Ford, who was born on July 30th, 1863 and died on April 7th, 1947,was an American industrialist, the founder of the Ford Motor Company, and the sponsor of the development of the assembly line technique of mass production.

Although Ford did not invent the automobile or the assembly line, he developed and manufactured the first automobile that many middle class Americans could afford. In doing so, Ford converted the automobile from an expensive curiosity into a practical conveyance, that would profoundly impact the landscape of the twentieth century.

His introduction of the Model T automobile revolutionized transportation and American industry.

As the owner of the Ford Motor Company, he became one of the richest and best-known people in the world. He is credited with “Fordism”: mass production of inexpensive goods coupled with high wages for workers.

Ford had a global vision, with consumerism as the key to peace. His intense commitment to systematically lowering costs resulted in many technical and business innovations, including a franchise system that put dealerships throughout most of North America and in major cities on six continents.

Ford left most of his vast wealth to the Ford Foundation and arranged for his family to control the company permanently.

Henry Ford made made his name and fortune by solving the problem of making the motor car affordable to the mass middle classes of America.

The Model T was introduced on October 1, 1908. It had the steering wheel on the left, which every other company soon copied. The entire engine and transmission were enclosed; the four cylinders were cast in a solid block; the suspension used two semi-elliptic springs. The car was very simple to drive, and easy and cheap to repair. It was so cheap at $825 in 1908 ($21,730 today) (the price fell every year) that by the 1920s, a majority of American drivers had learned to drive on the Model T.

It’s one thing having created a great product, but the next problem you have is letting people know about it, so they can buy it. Ford created a huge publicity machine in Detroit to ensure every newspaper carried stories and ads about the new product. Ford’s network of local dealers made the car ubiquitous in almost every city in North America. As independent dealers, the franchises grew rich and publicised not just the Ford but the concept of automobiling.

Sales skyrocketed — several years posted 100% gains on the previous year. Always on the hunt for more efficiency and lower costs, in 1913 Ford introduced the moving assembly belts into his plants, which enabled an enormous increase in production.

Sales passed 250,000 in 1914. By 1916, as the price dropped to $360 for the basic touring car, sales reached 472,000.[15] (Using the consumer price index, this price was equivalent to $7,020 in 2008 dollars.)

By 1918, half of all cars in America were Model T’s. All new cars were black; as Ford wrote in his autobiography,

“Any customer can have a car painted any color that he wants so long as it is black”.

Until the development of the assembly line, which mandated black because of its quicker drying time, Model Ts were available in other colors, including red. The design was fervently promoted and defended by Ford, and production continued as late as 1927; the final total production was 15,007,034. This record stood for the next 45 years. This record was achieved in 19 years from the introduction of the first Model T in 1908.

Ford was a pioneer of “welfare capitalism”, designed to improve the lot of his workers and especially to reduce the heavy turnover that had many departments hiring 300 men per year to fill 100 slots. Efficiency meant hiring and keeping the best workers.

Ford astonished the world in 1914 by offering a $5 per day wage ($120 today), which more than doubled the rate of most of his workers.

The move proved extremely profitable; instead of constant turnover of employees, the best mechanics in Detroit flocked to Ford, bringing their human capital and expertise, raising productivity, and lowering training costs.

Ford announced his $5-per-day program on January 5, 1914, raising the minimum daily pay from $2.34 to $5 for qualifying workers. It also set a new, reduced workweek, although the details vary in different accounts. Ford and Crowther in 1922 described it as six 8-hour days, giving a 48-hour week, while in 1926 they described it as five 8-hour days, giving a 40-hour week.

Henry Ford did not invent the automobile. He didn’t even invent the assembly line. But more than any other single individual, he was responsible for transforming the automobile from an invention of unknown utility into an innovation that profoundly shaped the 20th century and continues to affect our lives today.

Through his knack of solving problems Henry Ford created a global business and huge prsonal wealth and creating a legacy, of affordable cars for everybody, mass production, marketing, the franchise system and the 40 hour week.

Most peole try to avoid problems by finding a way round them, some people more frustratingly stick their head in the sand when faced by problems, but as Henry Ford showed so spectacularly solving problems is a much more efficient and profitable way of dealing with them.

Many a great business has been made of solving people’s problems, so instead of avoiding or ignoring your problems why not look at them in a positive manner, tackle them head on and find a solution to your problems, the feelings and rewards you will achieve could completely change your life.

Have a super Sunday peeps,

Breathe, Believe and Achieve

Be Happy, Healthy and Wise

Keep on Winning, Smiling and Living the Dream

Namaste

Steve Agyei

Founder of Beyond Lifestyle Secrets

Author of Celebrity Training Secrets

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