Integrated Literacy > Modules > Write Small, Learn Big

More Pieces, More Practice

Writing is the hardest skill we teach. For kids it’s the hardest to learn. There’s no disagreement that everyone needs more practice.

The way to get more practice (without needing more time) is to publish more short pieces. Short pieces are easier to revise. Revision practice is the best practice. It’s the most valuable activity writers pursue.

Revision is where the most learning occurs. Why? Because even the simplest revisions require kids to think about quality and technique.

Writers first identify something to improve. Then they try to improve it. But there’s more to it than that.

Next, they compare the revision with the original. Finally, they choose the best option. In this comparison, kids evaluate their work and learn how to improve it.

The goal of our teaching is to help kids produce better writing. Revision is where kids go to make their writing better.

Revision is also where adult writers spend most of their time in the practice of their profession — even if their profession isn’t writing.

To become life-ready writers, kids need many revision lessons, many revision techniques, and many opportunities to put this teaching into practice under conditions conducive to learning.

Time spent in revision is the most valuable time kids can spend. Time spent in editing runs a close second. Time spent on short pieces gives kids more time to do both.

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