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Photo: Twitter

So Yes! I am a procrastinator. Yes, like all the procrastinators I always make time-tables, that never got followed, and plans, that never executed. So what’s the difference between a procrastinator’s mind and a non-procrastinators mind. According to Tim Urban(a blogger), both have a Rational Decision-Maker but, all the procrastinators have a sidekick in their brain, and that is “Instant Gratification Monkey”. So the Rational Decision-Maker will make the rational decision to do something productive, and make some plans for that, but the monkey doesn’t like that plan and says, actually let’s hop on to the Youtube or Instagram or go over to the fridge, to see if there’s anything new in there since 10 minutes ago. …


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Photo: bookreviews.roseannasunley.com

When we’re looking at successful people whether in sports entertainment or anything else really it’s tempting to think that the reason for their success is the talent they’ve got something special, something we can’t replicate and that’s this secret sauce. But let me ask you a question, please fill this blank, “The talent is __________”. I know it’s really hard to actually fill in. It’s potential? or what? we start to use metaphors. “Talent is the rate at which, you increase in your skill with effort.” Some people are going to increase their skills faster than others. I came to this definition in one of the Google Talks, guested the Angela Duckworth(Professor of Psychology at the University of Pennsylvania and a ‎MacArthur Fellow). She was invited to talk about her amazing book Grit. …


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Photo: Twitter

“I am a young white educated male, I got really really lucky and life isn’t fair.” those are not my words those are the words of Evan Spiegel the co-founder of Snapchat according to Forbes he was the youngest self-made billionaire in the world at one point aged only just 24 he reached a billion. what’s interesting is how he acknowledges the privileges that he’s had and it makes us think about who we look up to in society, the images that we get of Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg and Elon Musk, these are the kinds of people that we see and we put as successes. …


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Photo: Getty

Many of us have a common tendency to complain, to complain about the things which cause failure. But the thing is most of the time we are analyzing the results too early, we become impatient and try to over-analyse also. There is a rule about how much time you have to have to master a craft and be comfortable with it, that is the 10-year rule. …


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Photo: Unsplash

We all need different kinds of mindsets while reading different types of content, it’s like wearing two hats, and don’t confuse them. I came across it in an episode of the Tim Ferriss Show where he’s interviewing Safi Bahcall, a physicist, business executive, and author. In that podcast, Safi talks about the “Ricles and Reas” framework, which he uses for studying and research. Safi gives some silly acronyms to his processes to make it easy to remember and understand.

Ricles is, reading for information, content and lessons. It’s like when you are reading it for the research or something for academics or something for knowledge then you shouldn’t care about the style of the writing, the craft of the story or anything artistic. What you care about is facts or idea of the stories and lessons. …


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source: independentage

We are often told not to mention the word “death” by our parents and the elderly. Talking about death often feels like a taboo subject in our society, let alone openly discuss it.

I often question myself why people are excessively opposed to death. We try our best to avoid the topic as if death doesn’t exist, or at least it’s not going to happen so soon. Yet all of us will experience the death of a loved one at some points of our lives. By talking about death, I am perhaps exposing you to one of your worst fear and one of mine. Let alone thinking about death makes us uncomfortable, it brings anxiety, denial, and sadness. …


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photo: Twitter

Have you ever worked exceptionally hard to achieve something and felt utterly crestfallen when you were unable to get it? Yet when you do, it leaves an ultimately hollow feeling? You parents may have once told you to enjoy the journey rather than seeking a goal, and there is truth in that statement.

Dichotomy of control

There is a branch of philosophy named stoicism (It’s a philosophy designed to make us more resilient, happier and more virtuous). Typically the Stoics would advocate the use of the analytical brain to maintain tranquillity over our emotions. One of the emotions was that of worry: how can we worry about the right things? One of the themes of stoicism is dichotomy and trichotomy of control. …


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photo: gettyimages

In this pervasive situation for this week quarantine content, I read a wonderful paper from 1989 by Daniel Chambliss. He breaks down the differences in daily habits, practices and mindsets between swimmers in different fields of competition (from local club competitions up to Olympic level). Here’s a quick summary of the main points.

Intuitively, we tend to think of excellence as a quantitative phenomenon (“he must work so much more therefore he gets better grades”). Instead, the author argues that excellence is much more about the qualitative differences. Quantitative work is important but it must be backed by the qualitative feedback — a slightly different approach to training, a different variety of techniques etc. These small changes, when compounded, yields excellence. Excellence isn’t just a result of working harder, it’s a result of working smarter in small, very achievable ways. …


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Photo: Shutterstock

You know that feeling when you come across something on the Internet and it immediately resonates with you and you think of 100 different applications for it? Well, I had that feeling after reading one of Seth Godin’s blog post. He talks about the sense of urgency. Sense of urgency refers to an internally-derived sense of direction, motivation and compulsion to move or act in some way. It involves a relentless focus on doing only those things that move you forward towards your goal. …


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The dichotomy of our education system is that “students are always rewarded for regurgitation, not for learning.” Let’s talk about school/college. For all of us, the school was a love-hate relationship. We like the social aspect of it, interacting with other people, but you have to study for the most part. In the end, there was a test or an exam, and all we care about was getting good grades. There is a sense of pride in getting good grades; getting good marks made us feel valued. If you think about it, that’s how we quantify success for students. …

Sudhanshu Singh

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