Two Favorite Books For Design & Building Websites

Posted onJust now by WillCampbell

I have been studying web design and web development for about 6 months now so I am far from being an expert. I have, however, been teaching myself new things my whole life and much of that instruction has come from reading books. So, I’m kindof an expert at that…maybe.

Probably not an expert but I do love books. I like books a lot and Jon Duckett‘s “HTML & CSS”, and “Javascript & jQuery” are in a league of their own.

Let me state for the record that these books are not how I learned to code. As I mention in a previous post I prefer learning from online classes provided at sites like freecodecamp.com and udemy.com. I do like to use books, as a reference, to find out exactly what I need to know when other sources lack the perspective I need to get that “A-HA” moment. Jon Duckett doesn’t assume any prior understanding in his explanations or examples.

Both books provide solid information presented in a format that is both elegant and thorough. Page layout and quality colors make it an easy read on the eyes. A far cry from the days of blurry eyed textbooks. This is a long awaited style for the internet age.

He has dedicated entire pages to illustrate each chunk of information. And each type of page has its own style.

  • Introduction pages come at the beginning of each chapter. They introduce the key topics you will learn about.
  • Reference pages introduce key pieces of HTML & CSS code. The HTML code is shown in blue and CSS code is shown in pink while Javascript code is shown in green.
  • Background pages appear on white; they explain the context of the topics covered that are discussed in each chapter.
  • Diagram and infographics pages are shown on a dark background. They provide a simple, visual reference to topics discussed.
  • Example pages put together the topics you have learned and demonstrate how they can be applied in each.
  • Summary pages come at the end of each chapter. They remind you of the key topics that were covered in each chapter.

Not only does Jon Duckett deliver the desired information as promised but much can be learned about simple beautiful design just by flipping through the pages. It’s like a great website on each page.

Next time you’re at your local bookstore pick one up, flip through it, and see if you don’t impulse buy. Or just bite the bullet and get your copies on Amazon. You won’t regret it.

If you have books that you love about front end development or other web technologies let me know in the comments below. If you’ve read one of these and want to add your two cents, I look forward to reading those as well.

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