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With the majority of the United States on lockdown, millions are working from home.

For many, work has come to mean taking client calls in your bedroom, juggling childcare and conference meetings, and talking to co-workers through a computer screen. Yet, as account manager Thomas Beilke recently learned, remote working doesn’t guarantee your job is safe as people now face the harrowing prospect of getting laid off through Zoom.

“We had a meeting on Friday where [layoffs weren’t] even mentioned and then all of a sudden they’re like: ‘We’re going to have to lay people off.’ A half-hour later, I had a one-on-one meeting with my manager and they told me, ‘Yeah, we terminated your position’ and that was it,” says Beilke, who previously worked for a software company in Dallas. …


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It started with almond milk.

Tamara Lim was making her own, having found out that most on the market only contain two fragments of the nut. Wouldn’t it be cool, she thought, if someone created a brand with more elements? It would be more expensive, but costs could be offset through reusable packaging.

The recent college grad couldn’t stop thinking about packaging because it was her job to do so. At the time, Lim lived in Seattle and worked for Amazon, where she managed the mega-corporation’s packaging processes. …


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Struggling millennials are likely to be interested in almost any financial service that promises to bring a shopping cart total closer to zero dollars.

Accordingly, the BNPL (buy now, pay later) setup has seen a huge resurgence in the U.S. Unlike older models of “hire purchase” (a system by which one pays for a product in regular installments while having the use of it), Klarna, Afterpay, Sezzle, Splitit, and other such BNPL services all pledge financial freedom, empowerment, and higher purchasing power to their customers. …


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If you dream of starting a company and wonder what it’s like running the day-to-day of a business, you’ve come to the right place. In our series Startup Diaries, we ask new founders to take us to work for a day and reflect on what they discovered during the process.

Today’s Startup Diary is with Rebecca Lima, co-founder of The Lieu, a B2B subscription service for workplaces.

The startup delivers premium grooming and personal hygiene products that aim to create better bathroom experiences for workers, particularly women in the workplace. Rebecca and her co-founder are currently equity crowdfunding and have raised, at time of writing, nearly $70,000 from a community of investors. …


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On March 16, Denver, Colorado announced all eateries must switch to serving only take-out and delivery amid the coronavirus outbreak, following a domino-effect of similar policies enacted across the country.

“It was like watching the entire restaurant industry just collapse in a single minute,” says Erika Thomas, chef-owner of High Point Creamery in Denver. Her award-winning ice cream business has seen scoop sales drop by 70 percent and she expects overall revenue to plummet by 65 to 70 percent over the next three months. And yet, despite the drastic drop, Thomas has no plans to shut down.

“I’m going to do anything I can think of to keep us open,” Thomas tells Supermaker. “I have 40 employees and about half are full time or [work over] 30 hours a week and I’m going to fight for them. I’m going to fight to keep them in place until it’s just rendered impossible.” …


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As the coronavirus pandemic spread across the world, Vara*, a disabled, immunocompromised grocery worker in New York City, was forced to make a sickening decision: to keep their minimum wage job and be at high risk for contracting COVID-19, or safeguard their health and lose their income.

“My health had declined so rapidly. I didn’t feel like I was living, just surviving,” Vara told Supermaker, recalling the stress of working―despite feeling unwell―so as not to use up sick days they might need later. “I could see COVID-19 getting worse [and] I knew there was no way I could keep working there. I had to quit. …


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Hand sanitizer and face masks are sold out. Italy has closed its borders, and so too has the United States, as the number of Coronavirus (COVID-19) cases across the nation soar into the thousands.

As the coronavirus spreads, so too does fear over catching the disease. But underlying this viral panic is another dark symptom: increasing sentiments of racism and xenophobia — particularly towards Asian individuals and communities.

Chinatowns across the United States and the world have turned into ghost towns. “Most of the places have lost — if they’re lucky — 50% [of customers]. If they’re not lucky, they’ve lost 80%, so a lot of restaurants cannot open at all.” …


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Several summers ago, I spent nearly three weeks in the backcountry of the Sierra Nevada Mountains with my husband.

Our days were strenuously monotonous: breaking down camp in the morning, hiking up and over mountains all day, and falling asleep in pure exhaustion at night. Nowhere in the routine was there time to check my email, post to Instagram, or scroll through Facebook.

Nor did I need to. As a self-employed entrepreneur, I anticipated this lengthy, out-of-pocket absence, and I planned several months in advance so it didn’t impact my business, hurt my client relations, or weigh heavily on my mind. …


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Remember high school cliques? The jocks wore letterman jackets; the goths wore fishnets; the nerds wore chinos; the skaters wore beanies.

We assumed we could tell a lot about a person based simply on their clothes (the jocks were charismatic, goths were unbothered, nerds were clever, and skaters were rebellious). Similarly, we carefully considered what our own fashion choices said about us. And though most cliques fade once we leave the walls of high school, fashion remains a big part of our identity and how we identify others.

Undoubtedly, fashion speaks. And, today, it yells, as fashion has almost become a passive form of activism to support brands tackling climate change and other issues. Similar to trends in broader retail, people are no longer simply buying shoes. Rather, they are buying shoes — hoodies and jeans — that say something more. If clothes could speak, Madhappy is holding a bull-horn to the mouth of fashion, spreading an optimistic message about a global issue: mental health. …


Senior Associate Gabby Cazeau on putting her engineering background to use at Harlem Capital, a diversity-oriented fund whose team is comprised of over 90% people of color.

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Venture capital undoubtedly has a diversity problem. You could more accurately call it a diversity disaster. As of 2018, just one percent of VCs were Latinx, and three percent were black. “At an intersectional level, black and Latinx women make up zero percent of the venture capital industry,” reports Megan Rose Dickey for TechCrunch.

Harlem Capital directly defies these trends. Founded by Henri Pierre-Jacques and Jarrid Tingle — both of whom graduated from Harvard Business School in 2019 and are under age 30 — Harlem Capital is a New York based, minority owned, early stage venture capital firm. …

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New school business media. Community for startups & creators.

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