Lessons from the poet

There a few people that I’ve admired as long as I can remember. One of them is Emily Dickenson —

The first volume of her work was published posthumously in 1890 and the last in 1955. She died in Amherst, Mass. in 1886. Upon her death, Dickinson’s family discovered forty hand bound volumes of nearly 1,800 poems, or “fascicles” as they are sometimes called.

What I’ve always loved was her ability to distill a thought/story/image into a few powerful words. The absolute simplicity that she was able to create- moves me every time I read one of her poems.

Here’s one of my favorites-

SOME things that fly there be, — 
Birds, hours, the bumble-bee:
Of these no elegy.
*
Some things that stay there be, — 
Grief, hills, eternity:
Nor this behooveth me.
*
There are, that resting, rise.
Can I expound the skies?
How still the riddle lies! /1862

How can I streamline? How can I say my words so simply that my message is crystal clear? How still my riddle lies!