Marriage without Shadows

We get the word economy from the Greek. It means an independent household. And the word for the church has the same word in it — Oikos. Oikos means house. The house of the ruler and the house of the Lord.

When you look at the history of Western thought you have the 12th Century troubadors who identified Amor (a gift from the Sufis that they personalized) as different from eros and different yet again from agape. It was an arrest. Similar in tone to aesthetic arrest.

But it reflected the maturing of the soul in the mirror of family life. The cessation of the separation of church and state as authorities in the mind of man and the alignment of moral power with the imaginative life of the individual (the “world of Caesar” goes on). The heart was put to good and wise use.

It was about finding a level of trust that wasn’t of the ordinary sphere of conscious experience (that was reserved for escapist piety at the altar of fear often before that — and it really threatened the church and ushered in the Renaissance and was of the same stream as the Arthurian knights and aligned with the search for the grail as the search for balance and meaning in the web of nature). That romantic flavor really transformed the global culture and its impact is still there. But it had to be a driving desire within oneself for it to succeed (above say a desire to dominate or be subdued). Meaning the healing of the androgyny in oneself. The marriage of spiirt and mind for the benefit of the soul’s highest aims.

Then, when the Mayflower sailed that ideal was coded into the prevailing religion of the day — the Pilgrims took the troubador influence and ordained it into a relationship focus…they saw marriage as the “church within the church.” You can see what a mess it was to handle what the troubadors unleashed! It was hard for the church to give birth to the psychological age — but inevitable — as all mature metaphysical viewpoints recognize.

Then came Jung who contemplated the shadow. And in a sense George Macdonald. the storyteller from Scotland, he was what Jung was looking for in his practice. George was very happy and saw into the puzzle of it all. Retained his dancing shoes you might say. People like that are wonderful discoveries. They play out the story of seeing clearly, quietly, into the weave of their lives.

The cessation of the separation of church and state in the sovereignty of the individual. It was about finding a level of trust that wasn’t of the ordinary sphere of conscious experience (it was reserved for piety at the altar of fear often before that — and it really threatened the church and ushered in the Renaissance and was of the same stream as the Arthurian knights). That really transformed the global culture and its impact is still there. But it had to be a driving desire within oneself for it to succeed (above say a desire to dominate or be subdued). .

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Later, the Course in Miracles was written as if to anoint Macdonald’s Everyman — Anodos. — the hero of Phantastes — one of the rare adult fantasy fictions of Western literature (Anodos means Everyman in Ancient Greek) — and it seeks to renew the sanctity of relationship by reminding man that our “meaningless thoughts show us a meaningless world”…and what is looking out through us is something sacred. You can see why the values that inform a household is at the core of a sacred economy.

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