Why you’ll never find yesterday’s weather forecast

September 2, 2015

Covering blunders? One big conspiracy? Or … could it just be as pointless as buying CD storage racks when you only really use music streaming service?

In any case, let’s try and start by dividing the good to know and the nice to know. The former is your map and gets you there. The latter is your compass and brings some added value — speed, convenience, you name it. Armed with both, you are ideally able to make informed decisions as the more accurate and complete your knowledge, the smarter the choices it triggers. But now back on the weather forecast. And how exactly is it connected to your business and your aspirations to grow, innovate and do better. Believe it or not, there is very simple yet dramatic resemblance between the two.

Let’s imagine for a second you could only look back in time and ground your current behaviour on insights collected in the past, like yesterday’s weather. Repetition will endure until something breaks the wheel, like unexpected rain. You are being reactive and it’s the cause and effect vacuum space model that you can follow infinitely but has no practical value when change comes upon you. Just like the windmill won’t grind grains on a still day.

So the next logical step following adaptation is increasing your agility to combat the peculiarities of the environment. Becoming active is a projection of your acquired knowledge and skills and here you can find an inspirational talk in the context of living in (and dealing with) the present. When you’ve got the choice to either join the momentum or deviate and take a shortcut, you ultimately have the mindset and are ready to accept change, innovate and improve. Truth is, no business or venture is out there to fail. In the world of www and universal knowledge (remember, good and nice to know’s) everyone wants to wake up on the morrow to the clear blue sky.

This image hangs on the wall in an Innovation Lab in Stockholm to remind that bad results can be, in fact, great lessons. Don’t get stuck in overanalysing what has happened — understand, assess and move on. Most importantly, let your own experience and instincts guide your next steps. Perhaps what the rain you dreaded really did was fertilise the soil so the seeds you plant today can grow and flourish tomorrow.


Originally published at svetlawdo.svbtle.com.