Arts and Crafts of Designing a Container Platform — Part 2: Get Out Your Colors

Written by Hasibe Göçülü and Sergio Vicente Ruiz

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The Arts and Crafts of … by Tom Rourke

As we outlined in Part 1: Sharpen the Pencil of this blog series, choosing the right container platform could be a challenging duty.

In this post we will introduce the main Kubernetes offerings provided by Cloud Service Providers (CSPs) and Software Vendors, which will setup the base for designing the right solution for the company needs.

To understand better the information provided in this post, below is shown the colors and shapes legend relevant to the tables and figures hereunder.

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Colors and Shapes Legend

The main CSPs and Software Vendors have developed Kubernetes services, distributions and bundles, to deliver Kubernetes on public cloud and traditional data centers.

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Kubernetes Services and Bundles from CSPs

¹ ROKS on IBM Cloud Satellite is in tech preview
² Anthos GKE on AWS is in preview

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Kubernetes Distributions from Software Vendors

When the various services, distributions and bundles are categorized based on the Kubernetes distribution in use, the result is that Red Hat OpenShift is the most used, although only engineered either by Red Hat or by IBM Cloud.

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Categorized by Kubernetes Distribution

However, when the various services, distributions and bundles are categorized based on the underlying infrastructure provider, the result shows that AWS and VMWare are the infrastructure providers on which more alternatives can run, coping more than 50% of the total under analysis.

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Categorized by Infrastructure Provider

Note that the Kubernetes offerings, bundles and distributions considered on the previous analysis have been selected based on some of the top used, as listed in the book The State of the Kubernetes Ecosystem, Second Edition, The New Stack.

Note from the book: The names of many offerings have changed since the question was originally asked. Combined with both the Pivotal and VMware offerings, Tanzu may see an improved position when 2020’s survey results are released.

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Container Management Platforms, The State of the Kubernetes Ecosystem, Second Edition

As a simple conclusion and main take away of this post, we will remark that understanding the details of what the Kubernetes offerings provided by Cloud Service Providers (CSPs) and Software Vendors will offer, is paramount to design the right container platform based on the company principles and requirements.

In Part 3: Framing your Painting of this blog series, we will explain which are some of the available Kubernetes management tools and services and their coverage for the CSPs and Software Vendors offerings, that could help to manage the multiple Kubernetes-based environments deployed across public clouds and traditional data centers.

Stay tuned and follow us on Twitter for news and updates on this series!

Hasibe Goculu
Sergio Vicente Ruiz

Disclaimer:

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that the information provided is reasonably comprehensive, accurate, clear and up to date at the time of writing this document.

However, the information provided on or via this document may not necessarily be completely comprehensive or accurate, and, for this reason, links to the official CSPs and Software Vendors documentation sites have been included.

References Links:

Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Engine
AWS Regions
AWS Local Zone
AWS Wavelength
AWS Outposts
IBM Cloud Kubernetes Services
Red Hat OpenShift on IBM Cloud
IBM Cloud Satellite
Google Kubernetes Engine
Anthos GKE on prem
Anthos GKE on AWS
Azure Kubernetes Service
AKS Engine
Azure Stack Hub
Azure Red Hat OpenShift
OpenShift Container Platform
OpenShift Dedicated
Tanzu Kubernetes Grid
VMWare Cloud on AWS
Rancher Kubernetes Engine
The State of the Kubernetes Ecosystem, Second Edition, The New Stack

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