Thanks for the feedback Scott Vinkle.
Robert Cooper
1

Looking good, Rob! One more tip that I’m not sure how I missed last time, but it’s super important to always add an alt attribute to your images. Even adding an empty attribute is better than none, as without, screen readers will announce the full file path to the image, the src attribute, which is pretty useless.

So, for your avatar image, you have two choices:

  1. Add a descriptive alt: what’s in the photo, describing your features, the background and foreground, etc. Basically, think about how you’d describe to someone who’s blind what’s in the photo.
  2. Or, leave the alt empty. This makes the photo a “purely decorative” image, which wouldn’t add to the content of the signature. You could go this way as you’re name is in close proximity to this image. I’ll leave it up to you.

The other tip for alt attributes is when it comes to the social media images. Since these are embedded within links, you should add a bit of text in the alt attributes describing what the links are for. Think about it as if the images weren’t there, you’d probably have something like, “Follow me on Twitter!” This is what should be placed within the alt attributes for these images. Screen readers will announce something like, “Follow me on Twitter!, image, link”

I think after making these last few changes you’ll be good to go with a highly accessible email signature. 💯🚀

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