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If you’ve used any styling library or framework like Bootstrap or Semantic UI, you’ll have used their many built-in shortcuts for adding consistent styling quickly to your project.

These frameworks have already done most of the heavy lifting, and allow you to get up and running really fast — but you may also have found it slightly annoying when you have been forced to use certain bits of default styling that you don’t really want. For example, you may not want to use their colour scheme, or their particular choice of button styling for example. If you’re a more advanced…


Photo by Rabie Madaci on Unsplash

This is the fourth post in my series about JavaScript’s handy built-in methods for different data types (links to the rest of the series are at the bottom of this post). There are a ton of handy ready-made methods that can be used to manipulate data, and I’ll be explaining some of the most useful ones.

Today’s post will be dealing with JavaScript Objects. Object can be a slightly confusing term as it can refer to any complex data type in JavaScript, (if you need a refresher, this post recaps the different JavaScript primitive and complex data types), but here…


Photo by Jamie Street on Unsplash

There are a couple of options for setting up git to track projects — we can set up the repo first on GitHub, fork or clone it, open up the repo on our local computer then set up the project from inside our local copy.

However, if you’re anything like me, in the excitement at getting started you’ll probably frequently have opened up your text editor, started setting up your project, then realise you haven’t done it inside the repo. If you’ve used a library or framework to initialise your project, it will most likely have some unique ID, which…


Git & GitHub are powerful tools which allow us to track all our changes to our projects and, when we inevitably do something that breaks them, go back to a previous working state. We are all aware of this time-reversing magic, but not necessarily how to do it!

Here’s a quick and simple guide on how to turn back time on your project and revert to a previous version.

Alarm clock
Alarm clock
Photo by Icons8 Team on Unsplash

Find the version you want to go back to

You have two options here:

1) In your terminal you can type:

$ git log --oneline

This is where it is important you gave yourself descriptive commit messages! It will show…


Photo by Rich Tervet on Unsplash

This is the third post in my series about JavaScript’s handy built-in methods for different data types (links to the rest of the series are at the bottom of this post). There are a ton of handy ready-made methods which can be used to manipulate data, and I’ll be explaining some of the most useful ones.

This post will be discussing array methods. Arrays are a type of JavaScript object that represents a collection of elements, denoted by square brackets, eg arr = [1,2,3,4]. Every element in an array has an index number, which refers to its position in the…


Calculator
Calculator
Photo by Charles Deluvio on Unsplash

This is the second post in my series about JavaScript’s built-in methods for different data types. There are a ton of handy ready-made methods which can be used to manipulate data, and I’ll be explaining some of the most useful ones.

You can see my first post about String methods, as well as a recap on JS data types here.

This post will cover the most useful Number and Math methods. …


Photo by Kevin Ku on Unsplash

This is the first in a series of posts I’ll be writing about JavaScript’s built-in methods for various data types.

There are a ton of handy ready-made methods which can be used to manipulate data, and I’ll be explaining some of the most useful ones here. I’ll add links to the rest of the series at the bottom of this post to use as a quick reference guide for all your JS built-in method needs!

Today I’ll be starting with String — one of the 6 JS primitive data types. If you’re not completely familiar with all of the data…


When starting out building websites the first thing you’ll likely do is learn some HTML — without the bones of the site you won’t have anything to work with. Then you’ll move on to making it pretty with some CSS. You can make a pretty nice looking web page using just HTML and CSS, however these days we’ve come to expect our apps to be interactive — to have elements that change or appear/disappear in response to a click, have responsive navbars and so on. We expect our user experience (UX) to be easy, intuitive, and seamless. …


When you start learning about designing applications, you’ll probably come across the term MVC pretty early on. Certainly for my software engineering classmates and I, once we had got to grips with building ruby methods and interacting with databases, lesson 1 on building functional apps was on MVC.

Photo by Startup Stock Photos from Pexels

What does it mean?

MVC is a software design pattern that is commonly used with many object-oriented programming languages.

Designing the structure of an application before beginning to write the code is crucial for building robust, scalable, apps.

Just imagine trying to build a house without planning it first. Sure you might have an idea —…


A mac open on a desk with code on the screen, an open notebook and a coffee
A mac open on a desk with code on the screen, an open notebook and a coffee

I’m pretty early in my career as a developer. Three weeks into the Software Engineering bootcamp at Flatiron School to be exact — and to say it has been a steep learning curve would be a hell of an understatement. Looking back at my former self (aaaall the way back to four weeks ago when I was grappling with the pre-work which students are required to complete before starting the on-site course), I cannot believe how much I’ve learned in such a short space of time.

Remember Hashketball and the Green Grocer Lab? If you’re a Flatiron student or alumnus…

Tolani Benson

Ex-financial analyst turned software engineer. Lover of learning, coding, cake and dogs. Not in that order.

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